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When Are Menopause Symptoms The Worst

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Worst foods & drinks for menopause

Along with the physical changes that occur after menopause, women may need to improve their health care routines.

Postmenopausal women are at greater risk for heart disease, so redirect your diet toward low-fat foods and lower your salt intake this reduces the risk of heart attack and atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaque builds up on the insides of the arteries.

As part of your routine check-ups, you should have a blood test at a minimum of every five years until age 50, and then at regular intervals. Your doctor will recommend what that interval should be based on how high your cholesterol is, if you are on cholesterol treatment, and on other cardiovascular risk factors that you may have, such as hypertension or obesity.

Women also should have their bone density checked once every two years to spot early signs of osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones. Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk for this condition: Research shows that up to 20 percent of bone loss can occur in the first five years of menopause.

Estrogen is one of the best stimulators of bone growth, Audlin says. The risk of osteoporosis is very low before menopause, but post-menopausally, fractured hips and problems related to bone density are very likely.

Women ages 50 and up should consume at least 1,200 milligrams of calcium every day to maintain bone health. This can be accomplished with supplements, by consuming calcium-rich foods like milk, or a combination of the two.

The 5 Worst Menopause Symptoms Nobody Ever Told You About

Menopause felt like a semi-truck hit me. And flattened me. One day, I was a fit, focused midlife woman; the next day a sweaty, cranky, perimenopausal creature took her place.

My friend, Theresa, was flattened by the same truck. We had never heard that menopause could be life-shattering. Was something very wrong with us or was this normal?

So, we got together with fifteen other women and started our research on Menopause & it’s symptoms – and share it with women through our Menopause Goddess Blog.;

The internet abounds with information. Still, the information available is incomplete. The Big Five symptoms that we always seem to hear about are these:

  • Hot Flashes & night sweats.;
  • Weight Gain
  • Insomnia
  • These are important issues and its wonderful that they have been addressed. But the symptoms about which Menopause Goddess Blog gets the most correspondence consist of another Five: I call them the Forgotten Five.

    And readers express more distress and angst about each of these life-altering manifestations than the aforementioned Big Five combined. Its time to bring them out into the open so that we can understand and cope with them.

    The Complete List Of 35 Symptoms Of Menopause

    Some symptoms ofmenopause can occur years before a woman experiences her last period, whileothers can last for years afterwards as well. Since hormones vary from onewoman to another, menopause affects all women differently. Some may experiencevery few symptoms while others could experience most of them. Symptoms can alsovary in frequency and severity.

    So, what are these symptoms that signal menopause is upon you? Lets talk about all the 35 symptoms of menopause to look out for.

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    What Other Life Changes Affect Menopause

    Menopause can be a rough time. In addition to the symptoms that may be tough to deal with, a lot of stressful life changes can happen around the same time as perimenopause and menopause.

    Some changes you may go through during this time in your life include:

    • anxiety about illness, aging, and death

    • anxiety about the future, getting older, and losing independence

    • anxiety about being disabled

    • changes in family, social, and personal relationships

    • changes in identity or body image

    • children leaving home

    • getting divorced or losing a partner

    • having a partner become ill or disabled

    • more responsibility for grandchildren

    Can I Still Get Pregnant After Being Diagnosed With Premature Menopause Early Menopause Or Primary/premature Ovarian Insufficiency

    Remedies For The Worst Symptoms Of Menopause

    Unless the ovaries have been surgically removed, it can be difficult to diagnose a woman younger than age 45 with menopause as opposed to primary ovarian insufficiency . Women with POI can have intermittent ovulation, which may or may not be accompanied by a menstrual bleed. Other women may be able to get pregnant through in vitro fertilization with egg donation. It is important to work with a fertility specialist to explore options.

    Options available to you will vary depending on whether you have interest in having children in the future. In some cases, fertility may be restored and pregnancy could be possible. Assisted reproductive technology , including in vitro fertilization might be considered.

    If you do not want to get pregnant while on hormone-replacement therapy, your doctor will talk to you about contraceptive options.

    Talk to your healthcare provider about possible causes of premature or early menopause and your questions regarding fertility.

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    Hot Flashes During Perimenopause

    Most women don’t expect to have hot flashes until;, so it can be a big surprise when they show up earlier, during perimenopause. Hot flashes sometimes called hot flushes and given the scientific name of vasomotor symptoms are the most commonly reported symptom of perimenopause. They’re also a regular feature of sudden menopause due to surgery or treatment with certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs.

    Hot flashes tend to come on rapidly and can last from one to five minutes. They range in severity from a fleeting sense of warmth to a feeling of being consumed by fire “from the inside out.” A major hot flash can induce facial and upper-body flushing, sweating, chills, and sometimes confusion. Having one of these at an inconvenient time can be quite disconcerting. Hot flash frequency varies widely. Some women have a few over the course of a week; others may experience 10 or more in the daytime, plus some at night.

    Most American women have hot flashes around the time of menopause, but studies of other cultures suggest this experience is not universal. Far fewer Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian women report having hot flashes. In Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, women appear not to have any at all. These differences may reflect cultural variations in perceptions, semantics, and lifestyle factors, such as diet.

    Sleep Problems And Mood Swings

    Try these options to avoid sleep problems:

    • Avoid large meals, smoking, coffee, or caffeine after noon.
    • Avoid napping during the day.
    • Avoid exercise or alcohol close to bedtime.
    • Drink warm milk or warm caffeine-free tea before bed.
    • Sleep in a dark, quiet, and cool room.
    • Treat hot flashes to improve sleep.

    Easing stress, eating right, and staying physically active can help with mood swings and sleeping problems. Your doctor may also prescribe medication to help with mood swings.

    You should talk to your doctor about managing your symptoms and to rule out other conditions that may be causing your symptoms, like depression or asthma. Its also helpful to join a support group for women in menopause so you have a safe place to share your concerns and issues.

    Your doctor may also prescribe menopausal hormone therapy to help treat your symptoms. MHT can ease:

    • hot flashes

    Studies show that women who take MHT are at an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and blood clots. The risks are similar for women using contraceptive pills, patches, and rings. However, women taking MHT are older, and the risks increase with age.

    Many women cant take MHT because of a previous illness such as cancer or because they take other medications.

    Additional research found that the risk of getting breast cancer can increase with five or more years of continuous MHT use .

    Women who have had their uterus removed will use estrogen-only therapy.

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    How Is Osteoporosis Diagnosed

    Your healthcare provider can order a test to give you information about your bone health before problems begin. Bone mineral density tests are also known as dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans. These X-rays use very small amounts of radiation to determine how solid the bones of the spine, hip or wrist are. Regular X-rays will only show osteoporosis when the disease is very far along.

    All women over the age of 65 should have a bone density test. The DEXA scan may be done earlier for women who have risk factors for osteoporosis. Men over age 70, or younger men with risk factors, should also consider getting a bone density test.

    Will I Start Menopause If I Have A Hysterectomy

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    During a hysterectomy, your uterus is removed. You wont have a period after this procedure. However, if you kept your ovaries removal of your ovaries is called an oophorectomy you may not have symptoms of menopause right away. If your ovaries are also removed, you will have symptoms of menopause immediately.

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    How Do I Know If Changes In My Periods Are Normal Perimenopausal Symptoms Or Something To Be Concerned About

    Irregular periods are common and normal during perimenopause . But other conditions can cause abnormalities in menstrual bleeding. If any of the following situations apply to you, see a doctor to rule out other causes.

    • Your periods are changing to become very heavy, or accompanied by blood clots.
    • Your periods last several days longer than usual.
    • You spot or bleed after your period.
    • You experience spotting after sex.
    • Your periods occur closer together.

    Potential causes of abnormal bleeding include hormonal imbalances, hormonal treatments, pregnancy, fibroids, blood-clotting problems or, rarely, cancer.

    Treatments For Menopausal Symptoms

    Your GP can;offer treatments and suggest lifestyle changes if you have severe menopausal symptoms that interfere with your day-to-day;life, including:

    • hormone replacement therapy ;;tablets,;skin patches, gels;and implants that relieve menopausal symptoms by replacing oestrogen
    • vaginal oestrogen creams,;lubricants or moisturisers for vaginal dryness
    • cognitive behavioural therapy a type of talking therapy that can help with low mood and anxiety
    • eating a;healthy, balanced diet;and exercising regularly; maintaining a healthy weight and staying fit and strong can improve some menopausal symptoms

    Your GP can refer you to a menopause specialist if your symptoms don’t improve after trying treatment or if you’re unable to take HRT.

    If the flushes and sweats are frequent or severe, your GP may suggest taking HRT.

    If HRT isn’t suitable for you, or you would prefer not to have it, your GP may recommend other medications that can help, such as clonidine ;or certain antidepressants.

    These medications can;cause unpleasant side effects, so it’s important to discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor before starting treatment.

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    A Postscript From June Girvin July :

    To all you lovely women who have commented on this blog THANK YOU.When I wrote this in 2015, I had no idea it would still be being read and resonating with women 5 years later. I also spent quite a while making my mind up whether to share such a personal experience. I am so glad I did if knowing that you are not alone has helped just one other woman, just one little bit, then it is so worthwhile. And to see so many of you posting and talking to each other about your experiences and supporting each other is a joy. I hope all of you find your way through, with or without medical help. Good luck.June

    The 34 Symptoms Of Menopause

    A Much Needed Help for the Worst Menopausal Symptoms

    The average age of menopause is 51. Menopause refers to a period in a womans life when she stops having a menstrual period. Many people think that a woman stops having her period overnight when in reality, menopause is a process that can last for years.

    The period leading up to menopause is known as perimenopause. Most women begin perimenopause in their 40s. Some women may experience so few symptoms that they do not realize they have entered perimenopause . However, for others, symptoms can be severe and life-altering.

    There are a total of 34 symptoms that can signify the arrival of menopause, which range from mild to disabling in nature.

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    Ask Yourself The Following Questions:

    • What is the treatment?
    • What are the side effects?
    • Is it effective?
    • How much does it cost?

    Once you answer these questions, discuss the therapy with your doctor. Make sure your doctor knows what therapy you are considering in order to discuss possible interactions or side effects with your current treatment.

    Hair And Skin Become Drier

    Your skin may suffer also. It can become dry and flaky, and wrinkles can begin to set in. Age spots will begin to show and skin cancers may begin to develop. In fact, it is at this time in a womans life that the risk of skin cancer goes up dramatically so its important to keep an eye on any concerns.

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    What Happens At Menopause

    Women are born with about a million eggs in each ovary. By puberty about 300,000 eggs remain, and by menopause there are no active eggs left.

    On average, a woman in Australia will have 400-500 periods in her lifetime. From about 35-40 years of age, the number of eggs left in your ovaries decreases more quickly and you ovulate less regularly until your periods stop. Menopause means the end of ovulation.

    What Is Menopause

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    Menopause is a stage in a womans life when menstruation ends. Natural menopause typically happens when a woman is in her early 50s. This is a normal part of the aging process and means that a woman can no longer become pregnant. There are three stages to natural menopause:

    • Perimenopause: This is a transition phase where the ovaries start to make less hormones, causing fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone, as well as less testosterone. This stage stops when menopause begins. Menopausal symptoms tend to begin during this time and can often be the worst.
    • Menopause: In this stage, a womans period stops. The ovaries no longer release eggs and estrogen levels become very low. Once a woman has not had periods for 12 straight months, she has gone through menopause. However, it is important to ensure that the lack of periods is not due to another reason .
    • Postmenopause: This is the time after a woman has gone through menopause. The symptoms that happen during menopause, such as hot flashes, may start to fade away but could continue for a decade or longer in many women.

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    What Can Be Done

    Lifestyle factors

    A healthy lifestyle can minimize the effects of the menopause, helping to keep the heart and bones strong. Many women feel that this is a good time to review the way they treat their body. Here are some tips to consider:

    Complementary & alternative therapies

    These have become a popular choice and many women use them, although limited scientific research has been done to support their effect or indeed their safety. They may sometimes help with troublesome symptoms, but they are unlikely to have a significant impact on bone strength, the heart or blood vessels.

    Choosing a complementary or alternative therapy can be a challenge; so many different ones exist. Acupuncture, aromatherapy, herbal treatments, homeopathy, hypnotherapy, yoga and reflexology have all been reported as being helpful in the menopause.

    To find out more about available therapies, please consult the WHC fact sheet Complementary/alternative therapies for menopausal women.

    Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Hormone replacement therapy is the most effective and widely used treatment for menopausal symptoms. As its name suggests, it is simply a way of replacing the hormone oestrogen that is lost during the menopause.

    How Is Premature Menopause And Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Treated

    Management of the condition can vary depending on why menopause started earlier than normal. Given the health risks associated with early menopause, hormone replacement therapy is routinely recommended to all women with premature menopause or primary ovarian insufficiency, unless there is a compelling reason it cant be used. There is a lot of confusion about the safety of hormone therapies. Many of the risks of hormone therapy used after natural menopause are not thought to apply to women who have premature menopause. It is important to discuss the pros and cons of hormone therapy with your doctor. Some healthcare providers have additional certification in the management of menopause, and these providers will be a valuable resource when receiving conflicting information about the safety of hormone therapy.

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    How Does Menopause Affect My Bladder Control

    Unfortunately, bladder control issues are common for women going through menopause. There are several reasons why this happens, including:

    • Estrogen. This hormone plays several roles in your body. It not only controls your period and promotes changes in your body during pregnancy, estrogen also keeps the lining of your bladder and urethra healthy.
    • Pelvic floor muscles. Supporting the organs in your pelvis your bladder and uterus are called the pelvic floor muscles. Throughout your life, these muscles can weaken. This can happen during pregnancy, childbirth and from weight gain. When the muscles weaken, you can experience urinary incontinence .

    Specific bladder control problems that you might have can include:

    • Stress incontinence .
    • Urge incontinence .
    • Painful urination .
    • Nocturia .

    What Questions Might Your Healthcare Provider Ask To Diagnose And Categorize Your Hair Loss

    How to Reduce The WORST Menopause Symptoms: Hot Flashes

    Your healthcare provider might ask about your habits:

    • What kinds of hair products do you use?
    • What kinds of hair styles do you wear?
    • What types of food do you eat ?
    • Do you have a habit of pulling your hair out ?

    They might ask about your history:

    • Has anyone in your immediate family experienced hair loss?
    • Is there anything stressful going on in your life?
    • What medications and supplements do you take every day?
    • Has hair loss ever happened to you before?
    • What foods are in your diet?

    And, they might ask about your observations:

    • How long have you been losing hair?
    • Have you been shedding more?
    • Have you noticed hair loss in places other than your scalp, like your eyebrows? Leg and arm hair?
    • Does anything worsen your hair loss?
    • Does anything improve your hair loss?
    • Have you noticed hair loss occasionally or has it been going on continuously?
    • Have you noticed if your hair growth has changed?
    • Has your hair been breaking more often?

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