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What Causes Hot Flashes In Menopause

Are There Any Positive Sexual Changes That Might Occur During This Time

What Causes Hot Flashes In Menopause?

You may find theres something of a bright side to this transition, too.

By now, you probably know plenty about what you do and dont enjoy sexually. Your sense of self and personal confidence might also be stronger and more developed than at earlier points in your life.

Increased confidence and self-awareness can help lower inhibitions, making it easier to communicate and connect with your partner.

Whats more, if youve raised children that have since left home, youre in a position to enjoy more privacy and leisurely intimate encounters, instead of having to rush through things when family members are out of the house or asleep.

Treatment Options For Menopause Symptoms

The Menopause Consultation Program at the Women’s Medical Collaborative was developed to help women understand what theyre experiencing, anticipate what they may feel, and try to manage their symptoms while maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Our experts can help you choose the best of several options for relieving your hot flash symptoms:

  • Hormones. These provide many women with relief and offer added benefits for bone health. But hormones are not for everyone. Some women prefer not to, while others cant due to certain medical conditions such as breast cancer or a history of blood clots.
  • Antidepressants. Newer studies show that some commonly used antidepressants can provide effective relief.
  • Non-medical treatments. We find that women who exercise and maintain a healthy weight have fewer problems with hot flashes. Relaxation exercises and meditation can also help.
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy . This form of psychotherapy may be beneficial for some women.

Treatment For Asymptomatic Bladder Prolapse

If you have no symptoms of bladder prolapse, you may not need treatment. This may be the case with stage 1 or stage 2 prolapse. In fact, you may not be aware of the bladder prolapse at all. It may be picked up by your GP during a routine examination, such as during a cervical screening test.

Lifestyle changes and physiotherapy are the key aspects of managing such cases. There are things you can do to help prevent the condition from getting worse, which may include:

  • weight loss
  • correction of position when sitting on the toilet
  • avoiding heavy lifting
  • pelvic floor exercises, which have been proven to reduce the symptoms of an early stage bladder prolapse and prevent any worsening
  • seeking treatment and management for chronic cough and lung disease.

Seeing a pelvic floor physiotherapist is always recommended so that they can assess your pelvic floor function properly and show you the correct technique for doing pelvic floor exercises. The best published evidence supports supervised pelvic floor muscle exercises for the management of prolapse and urinary incontinence.

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Beverley Coped With Hot Flushes By Using A Fan Wearing Short Sleeved T

The sweats got really bad. And it was funny because you could feel it from the tip of your toe and you could feel it rising and then Id glow and Id be fanning myself for dear life. I was a typical Caribbean person in terms of I always felt the cold. However, once I was into my menopause I was never cold, in fact I was always hot and this went on for quite a few years. I adjusted the type of clothes I wore and didnt layer as much. I could literally wear a short sleeved t-shirt or a jumper or blouse with a cardigan on top in the summer, in the winter, sorry, and Id be fine. Obviously, my jacket if I was outside. Because I didnt really feel the cold as much as I had done before. So its basically changing your lifestyle but you do it and then it becomes part of your normal day to day. And as I said Id walk around with a fan. I also had a fan in my office that was on my desk so I could put it on and if I didnt, if I was sitting somewhere where there wasnt a fan then Id try and sit somewhere where I had access to a window. So I could open it.And as I said, Im 50 now. The sweats have calmed down but every now and then I do get them but not as much and Im starting to feel the cold again so Im wondering if Ive come to the end of that cycle and my body is now coming back to something like what it was premenopausal.

The Symptoms Of Menopause

About Hot Flashes during Menopause

There is no one single symptom thats commonly seen in all women as everyone has a different menopause experience. Some women have very few symptoms, while others have issues that affect their daily lives. Symptoms are usually the most troublesome during perimenopause and can include:

  • Mild warm flashes or hot flashes with profuse sweating.
  • Poor sleep quality.
  • Anxiety, mild mood swings, flares of depression
  • Brain fogginess.
  • Body changes, including weight gain and
  • Fat redistribution to the abdominal area, also known as the âmenopouch, and vaginal dryness and pain with sex
  • Certain changes should be monitored, including rapid loss of bone and the development of atherosclerotic plaques in vessels and coronary arteries.

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Memory And Concentration Problems

During perimenopause, women often complain of short-term memory problems and difficulty with concentration. Study results looking at the relationship between falling hormone levels and cognitive function have been inconsistent. Some women do believe that low dose estrogen after menopause helps them think. But the research has not supported this. Stress likely plays a more important role in memory and thinking compared to hormonal fluctuations.

Treating memory and concentration problems. Just as it isnt clear what causes memory and concentration problems, there is no obvious remedy. Staying physically active and scheduling at least 150 minutes per week of dedicated exercise may be the best way to maintain brain health. Brain and memory experts also recommend that people work to keep their brain functioning at its peak by taking on new and interesting challenges. Use your mind in many different ways. Do crossword puzzles. Learn a new musical instrument or sport. Play chess. Read more books. Learn a new language or how to use the computer. The idea is to challenge your brain in new ways.

Hot Flashes Night Sweats May Linger Well Into A Womans Sixties

By Madeline Kennedy, Reuters Health

5 Min Read

– A significant proportion of women aged 60 to 65 were still having menopausal hot flashes and night sweats in a new Australian study, suggesting that bothersome symptoms last longer than is usually assumed and are mostly going untreated .

The use of hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopause symptoms has dropped dramatically in all age groups, the study authors note, but current guidelines advise against it for any women over 60, leaving this group with few options.

Most of the recommendations regarding management of postmenopausal women apply to women less than 60 years old, said Susan Davis, the studys senior author. So we specifically wanted to determine the prevalence of symptoms in women aged 60 to 65 years.

Davis is a professor of womens health and director of the Womens Health Research Program at Monash University in Melbourne.

Hot flashes and night sweats, also known as vasomotor symptoms, occur when the ovaries reduce their production of estrogen at menopause. While not all women experience these symptoms, for those who do, it can significantly affect quality of life.

Some women simply cannot complete a days activities without considerable stress, said Wulf Utian, an emeritus professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, who was not involved in the study.

Davis recommended that anyone who experiences severe symptoms should seek out treatment from a reliable source.

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Soy And Other Plant Sources For Menopause Symptoms

Isoflavones are chemical compounds found in soy and other plants that are phytoestrogens, or plant-derived estrogens. They have a chemical structure that is similar to the estrogens naturally produced by the body, but their effectiveness as an estrogen has been determined to be much lower than true estrogens.

Some studies have shown that these compounds may help relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause. In particular, women who have had breast cancer and do not want to take hormone therapy with estrogen sometimes use soy products for relief of menopausal symptoms. However, some phytoestrogens can actually have anti-estrogenic properties in certain situations, and the overall risks of these preparations have not yet been determined.

There is also a perception among many women that plant estrogens are “natural” and therefore safer than hormone therapy, but this has never been proven scientifically. Further research is needed to fully characterize the safety and potential risks of phytoestrogens.

Medications: Treating Hot Flashes And Night Sweats With Hormones

The Other Causes & Remedies for Hot Flashes & Menopause Dr.Berg

Some women may choose to take hormones to treat their hot flashes. A hormone is a chemical substance made by an organ like the thyroid gland or ovary. During the menopausal transition, the ovaries begin to work less and less well, and the production of hormones like estrogen and progesterone declines over time. It is believed that such changes cause hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms.

Hormone therapy steadies the levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body. It is a very effective treatment for hot flashes in women who are able to use it. There are risks associated with taking hormones, including increased risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, breast cancer, gallbladder disease, and dementia. The risks vary by a woman’s age and whether she has had a hysterectomy. Women are encouraged to discuss the risks with their healthcare provider.

Women who still have a uterus should take estrogen combined with progesterone or another therapy to protect the uterus. Progesterone is added to estrogen to protect the uterus against cancer, but it also seems to increase the risk of blood clots and stroke. Hormones should be used at the lowest dose that is effective for the shortest period of time possible.

Some women should not use hormones for their hot flashes. You should not take hormones for menopausal symptoms if:

Talk with your doctor to find out if taking hormones to treat your symptoms is right for you.

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Cancer And Cancer Treatment

Hot flushes are sometimes a lesser-known symptom of breast cancer, leukaemia, lymphoma or carcinoid syndrome . But hot flushes can also be caused by cancer treatment too, including chemotherapy and tamoxifen .

Seven out of ten women whoâve undergone treatment for breast cancer experience hot flushes.

What Causes A Hot Flash

Hot flashes occur when estrogen levels in the body drop. Estrogen is a hormone that is responsible for the regulation of the reproductive system in people with a uterus.

Falling estrogen levels affect the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls appetite, body temperature, hormones, and sleep patterns. The hypothalamus is sometimes called the bodys thermostat because of the role it plays in regulating body temperature.

A drop in estrogen levels can cause the hypothalamus to get mixed signals. If it senses that the body is too warm, it prompts a chain of events to cool the body down: The blood vessels dilate, blood flow is increased to the surface of the skin, and heart rate may increase as the body tries to cool off. Some people experience a chilled feeling after a hot flash.

Most hot flashes are caused by hormonal changes, but they can also be related to other health conditions, substances, and even certain treatments or medications.

Other things that can cause hot flashes include:

  • Alcohol
  • Thyroid issues

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Black Cohosh For Hot Flashes

Black cohosh is an herbal preparation that is becoming more and more popular in the U.S., and the North American Menopause Society does support the short-term use of black cohosh for treating menopausal symptoms, for a period of up to six months .

Some studies have shown that black cohosh can reduce hot flashes, but most of the studies have not been considered to be rigorous enough in their design to firmly prove any benefit. There also have not been scientific studies done to establish the long-term benefits and safety of this product. Research is ongoing to further determine the effectiveness and safety of black cohosh.

How To Modify Your Daily Caffeine Intake

Hot Flashes

If youâre a fast metabolizer, caffeine is simply not going to affect you as much, and in moderate amounts is likely to have minimal side effects. That being said â choose the healthiest, chemical free coffee or tea.

If youâre a slow metabolizer, Iâd recommend avoiding caffeine anytime youâre having trouble with hot flashes, insomnia, anxiety, heart palpitations, low hormone levels, low bone density, or adrenal fatigue!

If youâre a slow metabolizer of caffeine, youâre always going to want to avoid it or drink it very carefully in small amounts. If youâre a fast metabolizer, as long as youâre healthy and your hormones and symptoms are under excellent control, youâre likely to tolerate moderate amounts of caffeine without side effects.

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How To Stop Hot Flushes

  • See your doctor to make sure there is no underlying medical condition causing your hot flushes, particularly if youâre also suffering from symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, weight loss or diarrhoea
  • Check the listed side effects of all of your current medication. If hot flushes are listed as a side effect then discuss your prescription with your doctor. There may be a suitable alternative, or changing timing or dosage might help
  • Keep a food diary. This will help you identify whether certain foods or ingredients are triggers
  • Track when you have a hot flush. Write down where you were and what you were doing. This might reveal patterns or environmental factors that are causing them
  • Make time for yourself. Scientists have identified a link between hot flushes and stress
  • Exercise regularly

What Actually Causes Hot Flashes

The end of menstrual periods and increased sensitivity to extremes of heat and cold can cause the body to become hot and flashed.

This experience can last for quite some time and these flashes can be quite extreme. It is not unusual to hear a woman claim that she feels bathed in sweat. It is rarely possible to counteract this feeling with a dip in the sea.

Most women consider themselves lucky if they have the opportunity of a cool shower. Fortunately, these awkward symptoms do not persist for too long. Women are often embarrassed if it happens in company, as it is a visible sign of getting older.

Sometimes women live in dread of hot flashes, in which case they may be inviting trouble as the body sometimes reacts to ones thoughts.

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Dealing With Hot Flashes

Hot flashes can be a nuisance, but there are several lifestyle changes that may be helpful in dealing with or preventing them.

  • Keep the house cool and avoid overly warm environments.
  • Dress in light, loose, layered clothing.
  • Stay hydrated by sipping cold water.
  • Carry a portable fan.
  • Avoid alcohol, spicy foods, and caffeine in excess.
  • If you smoke, make a plan to quit.

Hot Flashes: What You Should Avoid

What Causes Hot Flashes? Dr.Berg on Problems Faced During Menopause

If a woman is subject to hot flashes, she should avoid hotly-spiced meals, alcohol, nicotine and excessive heat. It is sensible to choose cooler surroundings. It is also important to try to avoid stressful and emotional influences and to keep the brain occupied with something worthwhile.

A certain area in the brain regulates the body temperature, keeping it within 36 to 37 degrees Celsius and this thermostat in the brain is dependent upon the hormonal balance in the pituitary gland and the ovaries.

Diet is important and certain forms of medication and the contraceptive pill can be decisive factors in the frequency and intensity of hot flashes.

Some women choose to take an oestrogen supplement such as HRT to bring the problem under control quickly, but the bad news is that the hot flashes will return with more severity as soon as that drug is discontinued.

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Cynthia Managed Her Severe Night Sweats Using A Little Hot Flush Kit She Kept Beside Her Bed

In the early days, I had to get up physically on the hour every hour. It woke me without fail and I had to get out of bed, go into the other room, had a big fan, stand in front of it until I cooled down and then I went back to bed. You do get used to doing that and you do sleep in between. As I got better at managing them I think, I identified that I couldnt drink anything and I couldnt eat curry or Chinese food I got so that I had my little hot flush kit beside the bed. I had a towel and gel pack, sports injury gel pack that had been frozen inside of a pillow case. And Ive got dozens, dozens and dozens, and Ive still got them in a little basket of those little hand fans like youd have on holiday. And I had that beside the bed so when I woke with a hot flush starting, Id grab the towel and slip that underneath me, the gel pack behind my neck and the little fan resting on my chest and Id just lie there like a sack of potatoes until it passed. And then Id chuck it all off and go back to sleep until the next one. And I did sleep. I did get used to being tired but I did sleep in between each hot flush. But they were on the hour.

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