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What Age Does Menopause Typically Start

Removal Of The Ovaries

What Age Does Menopause Start?

If you have surgery to remove your ovaries , you will experience menopause immediately because the organs that produce hormones and release eggs are no longer present.

Menopause that occurs from the absence of ovaries is known as surgical menopause.

Conditions like endometriosis, tumors, and cancer may require a person to have their ovaries removed.

People who have an oophorectomy will experience typical menopause symptoms however, rather than having them come on gradually as they would with natural menopause, they will experience them all at once, which can be intense.

Hormone replacement therapies can be used to treat menopause symptoms. However, hormone therapy is not recommended for people being treated for breast cancer, as it may increase the risk of recurrence.

Treatments For Menopausal Symptoms

Your GP can offer treatments and suggest lifestyle changes if you have severe menopausal symptoms that interfere with your day-to-day life.

These include:

Your GP may refer you to a menopause specialist if your symptoms do not improve after trying treatment or if you’re unable to take HRT.

What Conditions Can Cause Early Menopause

Certain medical and surgical conditions can influence the timing of menopause.

Surgical removal of the ovaries

The surgical removal of the ovaries in an ovulating woman will result in an immediate menopause, sometimes termed a surgical menopause, or induced menopause. In this case, there is no perimenopause, and after surgery, a woman will generally experience the signs and symptoms of menopause. In cases of surgical menopause, women often report that the abrupt onset of menopausal symptoms results in particularly severe symptoms, but this is not always the case.

The ovaries are often removed together with the removal of the uterus . If a hysterectomy is performed without removal of both ovaries in a woman who has not yet reached menopause, the remaining ovary or ovaries are still capable of normal hormone production. While a woman cannot menstruate after the uterus is removed by a hysterectomy, the ovaries themselves can continue to produce hormones up until the normal time when menopause would naturally occur. At this time, a woman could experience the other symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and mood swings. These symptoms would then not be associated with the cessation of menstruation. Another possibility is that premature ovarian failure will occur earlier than the expected time of menopause, as early as one to two years following the hysterectomy. If this happens, a woman may or may not experience symptoms of menopause.

Cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

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What Is A Hot Flash

An estimated 75% of women experience hot flashes while going through menopause. A hot flash is when you suddenly feel warm or hot, followed by feeling cold. Typically, the skin flushes and the heart beats faster. Hot flashes that occur during sleep are labeled as night sweats.

While hot flashes vary from woman to woman, the often last around one to two minutes. They can be mild or severe and change in frequency depending on the woman.

Some women might continue to experience hot flashes as they enter into postmenopause, though, certain medications can also bring them on.

What Are Menopause Symptoms And Signs

What Age Does Menopause Start And End

    It is important to remember that each woman’s experience is highly individual. Some women may experience few or no symptoms of menopause, while others experience multiple physical and psychological symptoms. The extent and severity of symptoms varies significantly among women. It is also important to remember that symptoms may come and go over an extended period for some women. This, too, is highly individual. These symptoms of menopause and perimenopause are discussed in detail below.

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    What Kind Of Complications Are There

    A select few women may experience complications from menopause. While our intention is not to scare you, its important to notice any abnormal changes in your body and bring them to your doctor for examination. That way, any complications you encounter can be dealt with efficiently. These can include:

    • Vulvovaginal atrophy

    At What Age Does A Woman Typically Reach Menopause

    The average age of menopause is 51 years old. However, there is no way to predict when an individual woman will have menopause or begin having symptoms suggestive of menopause. The age at which a woman starts having menstrual periods is also not related to the age of menopause onset. Most women reach menopause between the ages of 45 and 55, but menopause may occur as earlier as ages 30s or 40s, or may not occur until a woman reaches her 60s. As a rough “rule of thumb,” women tend to undergo menopause at an age similar to that of their mothers.

    Symptoms and signs related to the menopausal transition such as irregularities in the menstrual cycle, can begin up to 10 years prior to the last menstrual period.

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    An Early First Menstrual Period May Lead To Premature Menopause

    How do you know if you’re starting perimenopause?

    The most telling symptom is changes in your menstrual cycle, says psychiatrist Hadine Joffe, the executive director of the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

    “It’s the menstrual cycle pattern that really defines this lead-up to menopause,” she says. During perimenopause, periods “might be shorter, then a long one, or then a skipped one, or then the flow might be different,” says Joffe.

    There’s no blood or hormone test that can “diagnose” perimenopause. Joffe says a hormone test isn’t helpful because hormonal cycles become erratic and unpredictable during this stage.

    “There’s not really one point in time when a hormone test is done that can be definitive,” she says. Even if you took several tests over time, “you might get a very different readout.”

    Surprisingly, sometimes doctors aren’t prepared to help women recognize the start of this life phase. Edrie was upset at her doctors’ responses รข or lack thereof. “I felt so disappointed in the medical industry. How many women has my OB/GYN seen and not recognized the symptoms of perimenopause?”

    What symptoms to expect

    Understanding The Menopausal Transition

    Perimenopause Age Range | When Does Menopause Start?

    Menopause is a point in time 12 months after a woman’s last period. The years leading up to that point, when women may have changes in their monthly cycles, hot flashes, or other symptoms, are called the menopausal transition or perimenopause.

    The menopausal transition most often begins between ages 45 and 55. It usually lasts about seven years but can be as long as 14 years. The duration can depend on lifestyle factors such as smoking, age it begins, and race and ethnicity. During perimenopause, the body’s production of estrogen and progesterone, two hormones made by the ovaries, varies greatly.

    The menopausal transition affects each woman uniquely and in various ways. The body begins to use energy differently, fat cells change, and women may gain weight more easily. You may experience changes in your bone or heart health, your body shape and composition, or your physical function.

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    Do Men Go Through Menopause

    Andropause, or male menopause, is a term given to describe decreasing testosterone levels in men. Testosterone production in men declines much more gradually than estrogen production in women at about 1% per year. Healthcare providers often debate calling this slow decline in testosterone menopause since its not as drastic of a hormone shift and doesn’t carry the same intensity of side effects as menopause in women. Some men will not even notice the change because it happens over many years or decades. Other names for the male version of menopause are age-related low testosterone, male hypogonadism or androgen deficiency.

    General Recommendations For Ht

    Current guidelines support the use of HT for the treatment of severe hot flashes that do not respond to non-hormonal therapies. General recommendations include:

    • HT may be started in women who have recently entered menopause.
    • HT should not be used in women who have started menopause many years ago.
    • Women should not take HT if they have risks for stroke, heart disease, blood clots, and breast cancer.
    • Currently, there is no consensus on how long HT should be used or at what age it should be discontinued. Treatment should be individualized for a woman’s specific health profile.
    • HT should be used only for menopause symptom management, not for chronic disease prevention.

    Initiating Therapy

    Before starting HT, your doctor should give you a comprehensive physical exam and take your medical history to evaluate your risks for:

    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Breast cancer

    While taking HT, you should have regular mammograms and pelvic exams and Pap smears. Current guidelines recommend that if HT is needed, it should be initiated around the time of menopause. Studies indicate that the risk of serious side effects is lower for women who use HT while in their 50s. Women who start HT past the age of 60 appear to have a higher risk for side effects such as heart attack, stroke, blood clots, or breast cancer. HT should be used with care in this age group.

    Discontinuing Therapy

    Safety Concerns

    Women who should not take hormone therapy include those with the following conditions:

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    Symptoms Of The Menopause

    Most women will experience menopausal symptoms. Some of these can be quite severe and have a significant impact on your everyday activities.

    Common symptoms include:

    Menopausal symptoms can begin months or even years before your periods stop and last around 4 years after your last period, although some women experience them for much longer.

    What Age Is Considered Early For Menopause

    What Age Does Menopause Start ? Get Answers To Related ...

    If you reach menopause before age 40, that is considered premature menopause, says Faubion. This occurs in about 1 to 2 percent of women, she says.

    Experiencing menopause at 40 to 45 years of age is called early menopause, and that occurs in about 5 to 7 percent of the population, so its safe to say that at least 7 percent of women are going to go through menopause early or prematurely, says Faubion. Menopause at age 46 or older is considered normal, she says.

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    What Is The Average Age For Women To Stop Experiencing Menopause

    The average age for a natural menopause in the U.S. is 51. However, it can occur any time between the ages of 40 and 58. Women who go through menopause before the age of 40 are classified as having premature menopause or premature ovarian insufficiency.

    However, these figures only refer to the age of a woman at her final menstrual period. Unfortunately, menopausal symptoms can last for much longer. They may start as early as a womans 30s and, in some cases, may continue into her 60s.

    On average, menopausal symptoms last for around four years after the final period and approximately seven years in total. But some women may suffer from menopausal symptoms for well over 10 years.

    Some of the factors which make certain menopausal symptoms more likely include:

    • Being African-American
    • Smoking
    • Stress and anxiety

    Therefore, women may be able to reduce the severity and duration of their menopausal symptoms by making some positive lifestyle changes. Maintaining a healthy body weight, stopping smoking, and managing stress could all have beneficial effects.

    Does The Age My Mother Reached Menopause Mean Anything

    Most likely your moms age at menopause will provide a clue. When we look at the things that are the greatest determinants for when someone is going to go through menopause, genetics seems to be one of the most important things, says Streicher.

    A womans race or ethnicity can influence when she goes through menopause, too, she says. Findings from the Study of Womens Health Across the Nation indicate that women of color tend to begin perimenopause and menopause at earlier ages than white women.

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    The question I always ask women when they ask when theyre going to go through menopause is, When did your mom go through menopause? because that is very often predictive, says Streicher.

    Theres a lot of truth in that. You may follow what happened with your mother if she went through menopause early or late, you may, too, she says.

    Certain medical conditions such as autoimmune problems, issues, and can make a woman go through menopause earlier, adds Streicher.

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    What Can I Do About Hot Flashes

    Hot flashes occur from a decrease in estrogen levels. In response to this, your glands release higher amounts of other hormones that affect the brain’s thermostat, causing your body temperature to fluctuate. Hormone therapy has been shown to relieve some of the discomfort of hot flashes for many women. However, the decision to start using these hormones should be made only after you and your healthcare provider have evaluated your risk versus benefit ratio.

    To learn more about women’s health, and specifically hormone therapy, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health launched the Women’s Health Initiative in 1991. The hormone trial had 2 studies: the estrogen-plus-progestin study of women with a uterus and the estrogen-alone study of women without a uterus. Both studies ended early when the research showed that hormone therapy did not help prevent heart disease and it increased risk for some medical problems. Follow-up studies found an increased risk of heart disease in women who took estrogen-plus-progestin therapy, especially those who started hormone therapy more than 10 years after menopause.

    The WHI recommends that women follow the FDA advice on hormone therapy. It states that hormone therapy should not be taken to prevent heart disease.

    Practical suggestions for coping with hot flashes include:

    Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

    What Is Menopause? | Ask The Expert

    The end of menopause means that your age becomes solid. It causes certain health problems and heart disease is one out of the list of when is menopause over. This problem also derives from low levels of estrogen and so, induces various complications from the part of the cardiovascular system. Commonly, this issue can be averted if you follow a healthy lifestyle. Its vital to consult a specialist in this field to define the necessary preventive measures.

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    Hormone Treatment And Therapy

    Estrogen and progesterone therapy

    Hormone therapy , or menopausal hormone therapy , consists of estrogens or a combination of estrogens and progesterone . This was formerly referred to as hormone replacement therapy . Hormone therapy controls the symptoms of menopause-related to declining estrogen levels , and HT is still the most effective way to treat these symptoms. But long-term studies of women receiving combined hormone therapy with both estrogen and progesterone were halted when it was discovered that these women had an increased risk for heart attack, stroke, and breast cancer when compared with women who did not receive HT. These risks were most pronounced in women over 60 taking hormone therapy. Later studies of women taking estrogen therapy alone showed that estrogen was associated with an increased risk for stroke, but not for heart attack or breast cancer. Estrogen therapy alone, however, is associated with an increased risk of developing endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women who have not had their uterus surgically removed.

    Hormone therapy is available in oral , transdermal forms . Transdermal hormone products are already in their active form without the need for “first pass” metabolism in the liver to be converted to an active form. Since transdermal hormone products do not have effects on the liver, this route of administration has become the preferred form for most women.

    Can Menopause Be Treated

    Menopause is a natural process that your body goes through. In some cases, you may not need any treatment for menopause. When discussing treatment for menopause with your provider, its about treating the symptoms of menopause that disrupt your life. There are many different types of treatments for the symptoms of menopause. The main types of treatment for menopause are:

    It’s important to talk to your healthcare provider while you are going through menopause to craft a treatment plan that works for you. Every person is different and has unique needs.

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    What Other Medications Treat Menopause Symptoms

    The classes of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors , typically used in the treatment of depression and anxiety, have been shown to be effective in reducing menopausal hot flashes. Paroxetine is an SSRI that has been approved for the treatment of moderate to severe hot flashes associated with menopause. Another SSRI that has been tested and shown to be effective is venlafaxine , although other SSRI drugs may be effective as well.

    Clonidine is a drug that decreases blood pressure. Clonidine can effectively relieve hot flashes in some women. Side effects include dry mouth, constipation, drowsiness, and difficulty sleeping.

    Gabapentin , a drug primarily used for the treatment of seizures, has also been used successfully to treat hot flashes.

    Progestin drugs have also been successfully used to treat hot flashes. Megestrol acetate is sometimes prescribed over the short term to help relieve hot flashes. Serious effects can occur if the medication is abruptly discontinued, and megestrol is not usually recommended as a first-line drug to treat hot flashes. An unpleasant side effect of Megestrol is that it may lead to weight gain.

    Several medications may be used for preventing and treating osteoporosis.

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