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Is It Normal To Get A Period After Menopause

How Long Do Perimenopause And Menopause Last

Can you get your period again after menopause – What does bleeding after menopause mean

Perimenopause, sometimes referred to as menopausal transition, starts when a woman begins experiencing changes in her menstrual cycle , as well as;symptoms related to a decline in estrogen levelsmost notably hot flashes.

The majority of women enter perimenopause sometime in their 40s, with the average age being 47. Perimenopause then ends when a woman has not had a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months;;this is termed menopause.

Note that perimenopause;refers to a period of time whereas menopause refers to a point in timea common misunderstanding and source of confusion.

The period of time after menopause is called postmenopause. During postmenopause, a woman has not had a menstrual cycle for over a year, although she may still be experiencing symptoms related to estrogen deficiency like;vaginal atrophy.;

The;average;length of perimenopause is four years, so the mean age at which a woman reaches menopause is 51 years old.;Of course, though, this is simply an average and does not predict the precise duration of time for any individual woman.

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How Much Bleeding Is Normal After Menopause

You may think you have reached menopause if you have not had a period for a few months. However, it is still possible to have a period up to a year after your last one. After 12 months without a period, any bleeding at all is not normal.

Up to 1 in 10 women experience bleeding or spotting after their menopause. In most cases the bleeding is not serious and a cause may not be found. However, it needs to be checked because sometimes it can be a sign of cervical or uterine cancer, so it is always important to see a doctor if you notice any vaginal bleeding after menopause.

What Treatments Are Available

If you havent completely gone through menopause and your cramps indicate that your periods are tapering off, you can treat them as you would period cramps. Your doctor might recommend an over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen .

Warmth can also help soothe your discomfort. Try putting a heating pad or hot water bottle on your abdomen. You can also try exercise if you are not in too much pain. Walking and other physical activities help relieve discomfort as well as ease stress, which tends to make cramps worse.

When your cramps are caused by endometriosis or uterine fibroids, your doctor might recommend a medicine to relieve symptoms. Surgery can also be an option to remove the fibroid or endometrial tissue thats causing you pain.

How cancer is treated depends on its location and stage. Doctors often use surgery to remove the tumor and chemotherapy or radiation to kill cancer cells. Sometimes, doctors also use hormone medicines to slow the growth of cancer cells.

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Woman’s Day: Bleeding After Menopause

Womans Day recently interviewed Jessica Chan, MD, assistant professor of OB-GYN at Cedars-Sinai, about bleeding after menopause and why women should never ignore that symptom.;

As the Womans Day;story details, transitioning out of menopause comes with uncomfortable yet common side effects like hot flashes, mood swings and weight gain. But, if your body is suddenly experiencing period-like bleeding after menopause, its time to call your doctor’s office and make an appointment.;

Menopause is considered official when a women does not have a;menstrual period for one year. Typically, women enter menopause around 51 years of age, but it can range from as young as 40;to 58 years old. And before menopause begins, most women experience changes in their menstrual cycle.;

During this transitionary time, your bleeding pattern may start to change due to some wild fluctuations in your hormone levels, Chan told Womans Day. At first, you usually have a shortening of the cycle. Then you may have a change in bleeding pattern. It can be lighter. Then theres a lengthening of the cycle. You may skip some periods;before you stop altogether.

But If bleeding occurs after menopause, doctors need to rule out other conditions. Post-menopausal bleeding can be a symptom of endometerial cancer — also called uterine cancer. About 10% of postmenopausal bleeding experience is due to cancer, the Woman’s Day article states.;

Read the complete story here.

How Does Menopause Affect My Bladder Control

Cramps after menopause: Causes, diagnosis, and treatment ...

Unfortunately, bladder control issues are common for women going through menopause. There are several reasons why this happens, including:

  • Estrogen. This hormone plays several roles in your body. It not only controls your period and promotes changes in your body during pregnancy, estrogen also keeps the lining of your bladder and urethra healthy.
  • Pelvic floor muscles. Supporting the organs in your pelvis your bladder and uterus are called the pelvic floor muscles. Throughout your life, these muscles can weaken. This can happen during pregnancy, childbirth and from weight gain. When the muscles weaken, you can experience urinary incontinence .

Specific bladder control problems that you might have can include:

  • Stress incontinence .

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Two Years Or More Without A Period

There are also a few women that will go for two years or more and find that they get a period back. This is not really very common. And as far as we’re concerned, once you have not had a period for two years, then that’s…you’re well and truly through the menopause.

So if you get any kind of bleeding, either a proper period, or you just get a little bit of smearing, or you get a little bit of spotting, then it really is important that you just get this checked out by your doctor just to make sure that there isn’t anything else going on.

So I hope this has given you a little bit of a better picture of one of the more puzzling aspects of what can happen to your periods as you approach the menopause.

If any of you have any other questions on this or you’ve had a slightly different combination, then please do get in touch, and I’ll be happy to answer your questions. And I will see you next week for another A.Vogel Talks Menopause.

Changes In Mood Including Irritability Anxiety Or Depression

âLately I have been so irritable and a mood swing can happen out of nowhere. I can be so content and then something happens and I find I am getting into exhausting rows with my partner.â

While mood swings might be fairly mild for some women and dissipate over time, they could be life-changing and last much longer for others. The key is to recognise the signs, especially if you think you might be suffering from anxiety or depression, and approach your GP for diagnosis and treatment.

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Prolonged And Heavy Bleeding During Menopause Is Common

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ANN ARBORWomen going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say its normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition.

The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause. They say the results could impact patient care and alleviate undue concern about what to expect during this life stage that can last anywhere from 2-to-10 years.

Sioban Harlow

For most women in their 30s, menstrual periods are highly predictable. With the onset of the menopausal transition in their 40s, womens menstrual periods can change dramatically. These dramatic changes can be disconcerting and often provoke questions about whether something is wrong, said Sioban Harlow, U-M professor of epidemiology.

Women need more descriptive information about the bleeding changes they can expect. We need clear guidance to help women understand what changes in bleeding patterns do and do not require medical attention.

The study, Menstruation and the Menopausal Transition, is reported in the current issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

How To Use Tamoxifen Citrate

Menopause and You: Abnormal Bleeding

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start using tamoxifen and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually once or twice daily for 5 years, or as directed by your doctor. Daily dosages greater than 20 milligrams are usually divided in half and taken twice a day, in the morning and evening, or as directed by your doctor. If you are using the liquid, measure the dose carefully using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. The duration of treatment to prevent cancer from returning may be between 5 to 10 years, depending on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

If you have breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, you may experience increased bone/cancer pain and/or disease flare-up as you start taking tamoxifen. In some cases, this may be a sign of a good response to the medication. Symptoms include increased bone pain, increased tumor size, or even new tumors. These symptoms usually disappear quickly. In any case, report these symptoms right away to your doctor.

Inform your doctor right away if your condition worsens .

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Generations Of Women Have Trusted Chapel Hill Obgyn

Often, several different diseases present similar symptoms. Thats why its so important to have a local gynecologist who understands your medical history and has been a partner in your care. Generations of women have entrusted their care to us for decades. If youre experiencing any bleeding after menopause, we encourage you to schedule an appointment with us today.;

For more than 40 years, Chapel Hill OBGYN has served women in the Triangle area, sharing the joy of little miracles and supporting them during challenges. Our board-certified physicians and certified nurse midwives bring together the personal experience and convenience of a private practice with the state-of-the-art resources found at larger organizations. To schedule an appointment, please contact us for more information.

Harvard Medical School. Postmenopausal Bleeding: Dont Worry But Do Call Your Doctor. Online.;

Mayo Clinic. Bleeding After Menopause: Is It Normal? Online.

Can Stress Cause Postmenopausal Bleeding

As we women age, our bodies go through some drastic and remarkable changes. After the childbearing years, the 40s and the 50s, the female body begins to change away from procreation as the production of reproductive hormones naturally begins to decline. This phase of a womans life is called menopause and is signaled by 12 continuous months since the last menstrual cycle.

The average age in the United States for women to start menopause is around 51 years of age. There are three phases of menopause that women typically go through and they are perimenopause , menopause, and then postmenopause .

Many questions surround this phase of female life, and for the purpose of this article, we are going to look at the postmenopause phase and a common question that arises often.;

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What Is Vaginal Atrophy

After menopause, your body makes less estrogen. As a result, you may have vaginal atrophy, which is the thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls. It can cause problems with urination such as:

  • Incontinence
  • Burning
  • Recurring urinary tract infections

In addition, vaginal atrophy can make sex painful.;Treatments include topical estrogen, vaginal moisturizers and water-based lubricants to make intercourse more comfortable.

What are uterine fibroids?

These tumors, which are almost always benign, develop within the uterine muscle tissue and often dont cause any symptoms. They are very common, and between 20 and 80 percent will develop fibroids before the age of 50.;

When fibroid tumors do cause symptoms, they include:

  • Painful intercourse
  • Longer periods
  • Abdominal or lower back pain

Only 1 in 1,000 fibroids are cancerous.; While there is no one definitive cause for fibroids, researchers believe they can be influenced by hormones or genetics. .;

Postmenstrual Bleeding Treatment Options

How to Distinguish Between Irregular Periods and Pregnancy

Treatment options for postmenopausal bleeding will largely depend on whats causing your symptoms. Estrogen therapy can be used to treat conditions such as vaginal and endometrial atrophy. Progestin therapy, on the other hand, is used to treat endometrial hyperplasia.

Polyps can be removed during a hysteroscopy, or they might require surgery. Cancer and severe cases of endometrial hyperplasia can require a hysterectomy. If youre diagnosed with cancer, your doctor will discuss several options with you, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal treatments.

As with most other conditions, the most important step when it comes to postmenopausal bleeding is to get an early diagnosis. Once you know whats causing your symptoms, you and your doctor will be able to discuss treatment options and decide on the best course of action for your individual case.

Discovering that youre bleeding after menopause can be scary, but in most cases, the underlying condition can be treated with simple therapeutic options. Ensuring your wellbeing and overall health should always be your main concern.

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Bleeding After Menopause: How To Get A Diagnosis

No matter the cause of your postmenopausal bleeding, its important to visit the doctor. In most cases, this symptom is caused by a minor condition; however, all possible causes must be ruled out. There are several different tests and/or procedures your doctor might recommend to discover the cause of postmenopausal bleeding.

When Are You Actually In Menopause How Is Menopause Calculated Defined Or Diagnosed

Menopause is defined as taking place 1 year after a woman’s last period. Once you have had a consecutive;12 months with no period you are officially declared to be in the menopause – congratulations! So you can find yourself putting the clock back to zero a few times if your period returns after a few months break.;

Some women have a period even after a;1-year break with no period. So you see why menopause can drive some women crazy – it’s so different and unpredictable!

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How Do I Manage Bleeding After Menopause

Your doctor will want to do some investigations to find the cause of your bleeding. Let them know if you have noticed any changes going to the toilet, whether you have pain, have lost weight or whether you are on HRT. You may also want to check whether you need a cervical screening test.

Some women may need to have an ultrasound, blood test or may be referred to a gynaecologist for further tests.

Treatment will depend on what is causing the bleeding. It may involve medicines to control problems with the lining of the uterus, or surgery to remove polyps.

Is Hrt A Good Option

What happens to your periods & whats normal during menopause

HRT is very effective at treating hot flushes. It protects against osteoporosis, too, although the benefit depends on how long you take it for and drops off once you stop. Taking HRT slightly increases your risk of getting breast cancer while youâre taking it, but this depends on how long you take HRT for, and the risk goes down when you stop treatment.

The risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism is increased by some forms of HRT but not others. Your GP can advise on the specifics of risks and benefits for you, depending on your medical history.

There are lots of lifestyle tips to cut the impact of hot flushes and sweats too, including avoiding woolly jumpers and polo necks; cutting out alcohol and caffeine; switching to a thinner duvet; and wearing several thin layers you can take on and off. Increasing the amount of soya you eat and drink may also relieve flushing, as can herbal remedies like Menoherb® or red clover.

Regular exercise can relieve hot flushes, protect your heart and help keep weight down. It can also protect against osteoporosis and type 2 diabetesâ and all drug-free!

With thanks to âMy Weeklyâ where this article was originally published.

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Symptoms Of Perimenopause Periods

During perimenopause, some may notice changes to the menstrual period. Some of these changes can be extreme opposites of each other, from lighter periods to heavier periods. This is caused by the extreme fluctuation of hormone levels.

Many women may experience all of the following changes, others will just experience just some. If it reads like perimenopause is a bit of a rollercoaster ride, thats not surprising – many feel that way!

  • Less frequent or irregular periods:Because you start ovulating less as you age, your entire menstrual cycle may not run like clockwork anymore. This can mean less frequent and irregular periods, including skipped months.
  • Spotting or lighter periods: Due to fluctuating hormones, you might experience very light periods or spotting between periods. Its worth tracking your periods and any irregular bleeding in a journal or app.
  • Longer periods or heavy bleeding: As periods become infrequent, sometimes the lining of the uterus has more time to become thicker. This means that when your uterus sheds its lining, there will be a longer and heavier period.;

Other symptoms include:

How Are Cramps After Menopause Diagnosed

If you have cramps after menopause, make an appointment with your primary care doctor or OB-GYN so you can find out whats causing them. Your doctor may do a pelvic exam to look at your uterus to see if there are any physical problems.

You might also need imaging tests to look inside your body at your uterus or ovaries. These tests can include:

  • a CT scan
  • an MRI scan
  • a hysterosonography and hysteroscopy, which involve placing a salt and water solution, or saline, into your uterus so the doctor can examine it more easily
  • an ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create pictures of the inside of your body

If your doctor suspects you have cancer, you may need to have a procedure to remove a piece of tissue from your uterus or ovaries. This is called a biopsy. A specialist called a pathologist will look at the tissue under a microscope to determine if its cancerous.

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