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Is Frequent Bleeding A Sign Of Menopause

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What are the early signs and symptoms of menopause?

Have a read of the very useful comments and discussions below to gain an understanding of the variety of women’s’ experiences of periods around the time of perimenopause. Many thanks to these fabulous Second Spring women for taking the time to comment and share their experiences. We all learn so much from each other. This menopause conversation needs to be louder and clearer to stop women from suffering in silence and feeling very isolated.

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Things To Know About Postmenopausal Bleeding

Spotting or light bleeding after menopause might not seem like a serious problem, but you should never ignore it or wait to bring it up with your doctor. After a womans periods have stopped, vaginal bleeding could be a sign of a health issueincluding endometrial cancer. Heres what every postmenopausal woman should know.

Are There Herbal Remedies To Help Me

Heavy periods at the start of the menopausal phase in your life can be treated using the herb Agnus castus which has the ability to stablise your hormones. This is especially so if you also suffer from irregular periods.

Agnus castus is a herb that is best known for treating the symptoms of PMS in younger women, but can also be useful for helping balance the hormones during the early stages of menopause, especially if symptoms such as breast tenderness, bloating or irritability are present.

If you have been experiencing heavy and prolonged periods for some time, and if you are beginning to feel fatigued and weak, it is important to seek the attention of your doctor.

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What Are The Stages Leading Up To Menopause

After puberty, there are three other phases of female fertility:

  • Pre-menopause: Women have full ovarian function, regularly produce estrogen and ovulate.
  • Perimenopause: The ovaries begin to fluctuate in their ovulation and production of estrogen, which can result in unpredictable menstrual cycles and symptoms.
  • Menopause: When the ovaries have shut down. Someone would be in menopause after 12 months without menses.

Could I Have A Polyp

Pin on Postmenopause: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

Polyps are soft outgrowths which can arise from the uterus and can cause heavy periods. They are usually benign with prevalence between 6% and 32%.3 Different research shows different prevalences and as polyps dont cause any symptoms apart from bleeding they are often under diagnosed. The prevalence usually increases with age which is why women may complain of heavy periods/irregular bleeding during the time of their menopause.4 It is still not known why polyps cause menorrhagia. A different blood supply to the polyp and impeded blood drainage may contribute to heavy bleeding.5

Polyps can be detected on ultrasound and removed using hysteroscopy . Very rarely can a polyp be cancerous .6 This risk increases with age, with post-menopausal women being most at risk, but there is no way of checking if polyps are cancerous until they are removed and sent to the lab.

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When Should I See A Doctor

Dr. Rebecca: If your bleeding pattern has changed significantly or the bleeding is heavy, please call your doctor. An occasional missed period is OK to watch and wait. If you havent had a period in a year and start to bleed again, please call for an evaluation.

A Gennev menopause-certified gynecologist can give you a trusted opinion, determine if medication is right for you, and they can provide prescription support. Book an appointment with a doctor here.

When Spotting Happens During Menopause

If bleeding or spotting occurs at any point during menopause, a woman needs to be seen by her doctor. During your visit, there will likely be a pelvic ultrasound and a possible biopsy of the uterine lining . Dr. Hoppe explains that this is to rule out any precancerous conditions.

If a woman is menopausal, she should not have spontaneous bleeding, Dr. Hoppe says, adding, Sometimes might be due to a thyroid abnormality. Signs of anemia and fatigue, along with spotting or bleeding, is also cause for concern and lab tests should be performed.

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Uterine Bleeding: What’s Normal What’s Not

One concern for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women is knowing whether irregular uterine bleeding is normal. Most women notice normal changes in their cycle as they approach menopause. Periods are often heavy or more frequent, and they may stop and start. But abnormal uterine bleeding may be a sign of benign gynecologic problems or even uterine cancer. Consult your physician if any of the following situations occur:

  • You have a few periods that last three days longer than usual.
  • You have a few menstrual cycles that are shorter than 21 days.
  • You bleed after intercourse.
  • You have heavy monthly bleeding .
  • You have spotting .
  • You have bleeding that occurs outside the normal pattern associated with hormone use.

When you report abnormal vaginal bleeding, your clinician will try to determine whether the cause is an anatomic problem or a hormonal issue. He or she also will investigate other possible causes. In addition to identifying the cause, he or she will help you manage any excess bleeding, which sometimes leads to anemia.

On rare occasions, postmenopausal women experience uterine bleeding from a “rogue ovulation,” which is vaginal bleeding after a hiatus that may be preceded by premenstrual symptoms such as breast tenderness. Presumably, the ovaries are producing some hormones and maybe a final egg.

There Are Several Potential Causes But Some Are More Serious Than Others

Menopause Symptoms: Bleeding

In most cases, postmenopausal bleeding is caused by issues such as endometrial atrophy , vaginal atrophy, fibroids, or endometrial polyps. The bleeding could also be a sign of endometrial cancera malignancy of the uterine lining, but only in a small number of cases. A 2018 study by the National Cancer Institute found that only about 9 percent of postmenopausal women who saw a doctor for bleeding later received a diagnosis of endometrial cancer.

Still, we want the option to intervene early if it is cancer, since treating it sooner leads to better outcomes, Mantia-Smaldone said.

If endometrial cancer is found early, a woman has a 95 percent chance of surviving the cancer for at least 5 years.

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How Do You Know The Cause Of Postmenopausal Bleeding

  • Identifying the cause of the bleeding can include the following:
  • Exam by your provider of the vagina and cervix.
  • Pap smear to check the cervical cells.
  • Ultrasound, usually using a vaginal approach, which may include the use of saline to make it easier to see any uterine polyps.
  • Biopsy of the endometrium or uterus. In this procedure, your healthcare provider gently slides a small, straw-like tube into the uterus to collect cells to see if they are abnormal. This is done in the office and can cause come cramping.

What Are The Symptoms Of Perimenopause

During perimenopause, you can experience a variety of symptoms. The reason: Your ovaries have been making estrogen since your first period. During perimenopause, the estrogen production decreases substantially. Your body has to adjust to functioning with less of the hormone, putting you into estrogen withdrawals. The type and intensity of symptoms vary greatly among women some just feel a little off or donĂ¢t notice anything at all.

Others can experience perimenopausal symptoms including:

  • Trouble sleeping
  • Feeling irritable, anxious or depressed
  • Night sweats
  • Hot flashes

About 80 percent of women will experience some form of a hot flash during perimenopause or menopause. Hot flashes happen when your brain has trouble regulating your internal temperature, which is a common response to having less estrogen. The shift in temperature may not be noticeable. Or, it may feel like someone cranked up the thermostat on your core body temperature. You suddenly feel uncomfortably hot and sweaty, or you may wake up drenched in sweat .

Sonya Collins Brunilda Nazario, MD

Before your periods stop completely, your body makes the transition to menopause in a phase called perimenopause, which could last 2 to 10 years. During this time, when hormone levels fluctuate and eventually drop, all kinds of changes in your cycle are fair game.

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What Is Hormone Therapy

During menopause, your body goes through major hormonal changes, decreasing the amount of hormones it makes particularly estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen and progesterone are produced by the ovaries. When your ovaries no longer make enough estrogen and progesterone, hormone therapy can be used as a supplement. Hormone therapy boosts your hormone levels and can help relieve some symptoms of menopause. Its also used as a preventative measure for osteoporosis.

There are two main types of hormone therapy:

  • Estrogen therapy : In this treatment, estrogen is taken alone. Its typically prescribed in a low dose and can be taken as a pill or patch. ET can also be given to you as a cream, vaginal ring, gel or spray. This type of treatment is used after a hysterectomy. Estrogen alone cant be used if a woman still has a uterus.
  • Estrogen Progesterone/Progestin Hormone Therapy : This treatment is also called combination therapy because it uses doses of estrogen and progesterone. Progesterone is available in its natural form, or also as a progestin . This type of hormone therapy is used if you still have your uterus.

Hormone therapy can relieve many of the symptoms of menopause, including:

  • Hot flashes and night sweats.
  • Vaginal dryness.

Could It Be Hypothyroidism

Pin on Menopause symptoms

Menstrual abnormalities, particularly menorrhagia, can be one of the first noticeable symptoms of thyroid abnormalities, particularly hypothyroidism.10 The incidence increases with age and thyroid dysfunction can be masked by menopausal symptoms.

The physiology behind menorrhagia in hypothyroidism is anovulation due to thyroid hormone deficiency. Correct levels of thyroid hormone levels are required to produce luteinising hormone which is needed to trigger ovulation. If the balance is disturbed, there can be a delay in LH production. Hypothyroidism can also alter coagulation factors which are required for blood to clot effectively, and therefore this can result in excessive bleeding.11

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How Is Postmenopausal Bleeding Treated

Treatment for postmenopausal bleeding depends on its cause. Medication and surgery are the most common treatments.

Medications include:

  • Antibiotics can treat most infections of the cervix or uterus.
  • Estrogen may help bleeding due to vaginal dryness. You can apply estrogen directly to your vagina as a cream, ring or insertable tablet. Systemic estrogen therapy may come as a pill or patch. When estrogen therapy is systemic, it means the hormone travels throughout the body.
  • Progestin is a synthetic form of the hormone progesterone. It can treat endometrial hyperplasia by triggering the uterus to shed its lining. You may receive progestin as a pill, shot, cream or intrauterine device .

Surgeries include:

Heavy Periods And Flooding During Perimenopause

Alongside changes in regularity, you may notice your period is heavier than usual. Before the perimenopause, your ovaries secreted oestrogen to thicken the lining of the womb. Once the ovaries released the egg, they produced progesterone.The synergetic relationship between oestrogen and progesterone ensured your periods werent too heavy or light. However, as you enter the menopause, ovulation becomes more sporadic, even though your ovaries continue to secrete oestrogen. Since there isnt enough progesterone to stabilise the effects of oestrogen, you may experience heavier periods.Some perimenopausal women can experience extremely heavy periods with flooding, medically known as Perimenopausal Dysfunction Bleeding . In this, bleeding can be so heavy that sheets or seating become soaked with blood when lying or sitting down.1 Naturally, this can interfere with your everyday life.Though heavy bleeding is common during the menopause, you shouldnt ignore it. We recommend discussing this with your GP.

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Spotting During Menopause: Is It Normal

    Menopause and perimenopause are a time in a womans life marked by endings and beginnings.

    While menopause technically starts 12 months after a womans last menstrual cycle, there are other factors to consider. As San Diego-based OB-GYN Dr. Diana Hoppe explains, menopause is when a woman goes from a reproductive stage to a non-reproductive one, with the average age around 51.

    Perimenopause, Dr. Hoppe notes, is the 2-8 years before menopause when a woman is still experiencing a menstrual cycle. During this time cycles can become more irregular, i.e. they can happen twice a month or they can skip altogether.

    She says both perimenopausal and menopausal women can experience shared symptoms including hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, insomnia, and . So, how exactly does spotting factor in when it comes to menopause, and when should there be cause for concern?

    Frequently Asked Questionsexpand All

    Perimenopause: Treating the Symptoms
  • Should I talk with my ob-gyn about my bleeding?

    Yes. Although its normal for periods to change as you near menopause, you should still talk with your obstetriciangynecologist about bleeding changes. Abnormal bleeding sometimes can be a sign of health problems. Its especially important to tell your ob-gyn if you have bleeding after menopause.

  • What are some of the common causes of abnormal bleeding?

    If you have any bleeding after menopause, or if you have any of the abnormal changes in your monthly cycle listed above, its important to see your ob-gyn to find out the cause. Many things can cause abnormal bleeding, including

  • endometrial cancer

  • What are polyps?

    Polyps are noncancerous growths that attach to the wall of the uterus. They also may develop on the endometrium . These growths may cause irregular or heavy bleeding. Polyps also can grow on the cervix or inside the cervical canal. Polyps on the cervix may cause bleeding after sex.

  • What is endometrial atrophy?

    After menopause, the uterine lining may become too thin. This can happen when a woman has low levels of estrogen. The condition is called endometrial atrophy. As the lining thins, a woman may have abnormal bleeding.

  • What are risk factors for endometrial cancer?

    The risk factors for endometrial cancer include

  • getting older

  • early age when periods started

  • older age at menopause

  • long-term use of medications containing high doses of estrogen

  • obesity

  • treatment with a drug called tamoxifen

  • certain tumors of the ovaries

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    Heavy Bleeding Flooding And Perimenopause

    Very heavy bleeding occurs when your oestrogen levels are high relative to progesterone causing the lining of your womb to thicken more than usual. During perimenopause, your body’s main systems are working hard to adjust to the changing hormone levels that are taking place in advance of full menopause. The most difficult situation to handle is probably very heavy, extended bleeding, or flooding cycles. Some women find they are changing tampons every hour, sometimes having a very heavy bleed during inopportune times for example, at a formal dinner. This often happens at night as well as during the day. Make sure to wear liners and change tampons or pads very regularly.

    If you have recurrent heavy and prolonged periods you may become anaemic as the body doesnt have time to make up for blood loss before the next period. You can end up feeling weak, exhausted, and maybe even depressed as a result of the anaemia, which then becomes associated with the menopause. Make sure to get help early on and don’t the situation develop.

    Very heavy bleeding can also be caused by fibroids. If you experience prolonged heavy bleeding, seek professional advice from your GP, homoeopath or another health expert. Vaginal bleeding is not normal after the menopause so again get professional advice if this occurs.

    The Perimenopause And Urinary Frequency Connection

    Perimenopause is defined at that period of time leading up to menopause, says Dr. Ellerkmann.

    Many physiological changes occur during the perimenopausal time period as levels of circulating hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone fluctuate and levels slowly decrease.

    The effects of estrogen on the urogenital tract are well-known, as these tissues are very rich in estrogen receptors.

    As circulating estrogen levels decrease and become less consistent, vaginal and peri-urethral tissues become less well-lubricated they become thinner and less elastic and less well-vascularized .

    It may be that the loss of estrogen can adversely affect the bladder, but whether the hormonal changes of perimenopause are directly related to symptoms of urinary frequency is difficult to say.

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    What Causes Bleeding After Menopause

    Bleeding after menopause is rarely cause for concern. It does need to be investigated, however, because in very few cases it will be an indicator of something more serious.

    In about 90 per cent of cases, a particular cause for bleeding after menopause will not be found. This is not a cause for alarm, if there is a serious problem it will be identified through investigations. Most of the time, postmenopausal bleeding is caused by:

    • inflammation and thinning of the lining of your vagina
    • thinning of the lining of your uterus
    • growths in the cervix or uterus which are usually not cancerous
    • thickened endometrium often because of hormone replacement therapy
    • abnormalities in the cervix or uterus.

    These are generally not serious problems and can be cured relatively easily.

    However, about 10 per cent of the time, post-menopausal bleeding is linked to cancer of the cervix or uterus and so it is very important to have it investigated.

    What Other Changes Should You Expect

    The Typical First Sign of Menopause Symptoms to Recognize ...

    Your period evolves in a number of ways once youve entered perimenopause. While some women have perimenopausal periods closer together, others might notice them occurring further apart. Further changes in your menstrual cycle after 40 often include:

    • Heavier periods: Your flow may become more intense over time. If bleeding is unusually heavy, however, be sure to consult your doctor.
    • Lighter periods: Inversely, a lot of women experience decreased flow for up to a year before their periods stop completely.
    • Skipped periods: Anovulatory cycles are another possibility during perimenopause. Keep in mind, though, that youre still fertile at this stage. So if youve recently had sex and missed your period, consider taking a pregnancy test.
    • Longer or shorter periods: Perhaps your period has always lasted for 4 days, but now its 2 or 6 days. You might even experience a random combination of both shorter and longer cycles while in perimenopause. This, too, is a fairly common occurrence.

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