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How Do You Know When You Finish Menopause

Can My Diet Affect How Well I Sleep

How do I know menopause has finished?

The following tips can help reduce sleep problems:

  • Eat regular meals at regular times.
  • Avoid late-night meals and heavy late-night snacks.
  • Limit caffeine, which is found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and cola drinks. Caffeine stays in the bloodstream for up to 6 hours and can interfere with sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol. It may make you feel sleepy, but it actually affects the cycle of REM and non-REM sleep. This may cause you to wake up throughout the night.

Cause Of The Menopause

A number of hormones are responsible for initiating your menstrual cycle each month. These are controlled by other hormones which are released from the pituitary gland in the brain. When a woman reaches a certain age, your pituitary hormones begin to decline, which in turn means that the ovaries stop producing their sex hormones as efficiently this means ovulation will stop. As ovulation stops, so do your periods.

However, this process often happens very gradually and hormone fluctuations along the way are common this means the irregular periods and other symptoms as described below are often a part of the experience.

When Do I Know That Im Having A Hot Flash

During a hot flash, youll likely feel your body temperature rise. Hot flashes affect the top half of your body, and your skin may even turn red in color or become blotchy. This rush of heat could lead to sweating, heart palpitations, and feelings of dizziness. After the hot flash, you may feel cold.

Hot flashes may come on daily or even multiple times a day. You may experience them over the course of a year or even several years.

Avoiding triggers may reduce the number of hot flashes you experience. These can include:

  • consuming alcohol or caffeine

Being overweight and smoking may also make hot flashes worse.

A few techniques may help reduce your hot flashes and their symptoms:

  • Dress in layers to help with hot flashes, and use a fan in your home or office space.
  • Do breathing exercises during a hot flash to try to minimize it.

Medications such as birth control pills, hormone therapy, or even other prescriptions may help you reduce hot flashes. See your doctor if youre having difficulty managing hot flashes on your own.

Are There Treatments For Menopause That Do Not Use Hormones

If you cannot take hormones safely or if you do not want to take hormones, there are other medications you can take to cope with menopause symptoms. If you feel depressed, irritable, or anxious, your doctor may prescribe fluoxetine , venlafaxine , and others. These can also help with hot flashes. Gabapentin can help with hot flashes and sleep problems. Oxybutynin can help with hot flashes as well as overactive bladder symptoms.

The Most Important Part Of Post

Stages of Menopause

Along with the physical changes that occur after menopause, women may need to improve their health care routines.

Postmenopausal women are at greater risk for heart disease, so redirect your diet toward low-fat foods and lower your salt intake this reduces the risk of heart attack and atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaque builds up on the insides of the arteries.

As part of your routine check-ups, you should have a blood test at a minimum of every five years until age 50, and then at regular intervals. Your doctor will recommend what that interval should be based on how high your cholesterol is, if you are on cholesterol treatment, and on other cardiovascular risk factors that you may have, such as hypertension or obesity.

Women also should have their bone density checked once every two years to spot early signs of osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones. Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk for this condition: Research shows that up to 20 percent of bone loss can occur in the first five years of menopause.

Estrogen is one of the best stimulators of bone growth, Audlin says. The risk of osteoporosis is very low before menopause, but post-menopausally, fractured hips and problems related to bone density are very likely.

Women ages 50 and up should consume at least 1,200 milligrams of calcium every day to maintain bone health. This can be accomplished with supplements, by consuming calcium-rich foods like milk, or a combination of the two.

Is Heart Disease Linked To Menopause

Conditions related to your heart may arise during menopause, such as dizziness or cardiac palpitations. Decreased estrogen levels can prevent your body from retaining flexible arteries. This can impact blood flow.

Watching your weight, eating a healthy and balanced diet, exercising, and not smoking can reduce your chances of developing heart conditions.

How Does Menopause Affect My Bladder Control

Unfortunately, bladder control issues are common for women going through menopause. There are several reasons why this happens, including:

  • Estrogen. This hormone plays several roles in your body. It not only controls your period and promotes changes in your body during pregnancy, estrogen also keeps the lining of your bladder and urethra healthy.
  • Pelvic floor muscles. Supporting the organs in your pelvis your bladder and uterus are called the pelvic floor muscles. Throughout your life, these muscles can weaken. This can happen during pregnancy, childbirth and from weight gain. When the muscles weaken, you can experience urinary incontinence .

Specific bladder control problems that you might have can include:

  • Stress incontinence .
  • Urge incontinence .
  • Painful urination .
  • Nocturia .

When Youre Going Through Menopause It Can Be Hard To See The Light At The End Of The Tunnel But Its Important To Keep In Mind That There Is An End To It

Hi and welcome to another edition of A.Vogel’s Menopause Flash. Today I’m going to talk about how to tell when menopause is over, including how long it lasts, the signs that menopause is finally over and how you can feel afterwards.When you’re in the middle of menopause and feeling really awful, or you’re just having a tough time, just knowing that it will come to an end can be really helpful.

Mackie Vadacchino

Can Menopause Cause Facial Hair Growth

How to know if you are going into menopause

Yes, increased facial hair growth can be a change related to menopause. The hormonal change your body goes through during menopause can result in several physical changes to your body, including more facial hair than you may have had in the past. If facial hair becomes a problem for you, waxing or using other hair removers may be options. Talk to your healthcare provider about your options to make sure you dont pick a product that could harm your skin.

Are There Nonhormonal Options For The Management Of Menopausal Symptoms

Hormone therapy may not be the right choice for you. Some medical conditions may prevent you from safely being able to use hormone therapy or you may choose not to use that form of treatment for your own personal reasons. Changes to your lifestyle may help you relieve many of your symptoms without need for hormonal intervention.

Lifestyle changes may include:

Hysterectomy With Ovaries Left Intact

People who have their ovaries intact, but without their uterus, won’t get their period anymore. They may, however, still experience premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder because the hormones made by the ovaries cause the body to continue to “cycle” monthly.

Occasionally, people whose ovaries were not removed during a hysterectomy experience hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. This is mostly due to the disturbance of the blood supply to the ovaries during surgery.

In addition, some people may undergo menopause a few years sooner than they normally would if they never underwent a hysterectomy .

What Are Common Menopause Symptoms

Some common menopause symptoms are:

  • Irregular periods: Periods becoming shorter, longer, heavier, lighter. Skipping periods.

  • Hot flashes: A hot flash is a sudden, sometimes intense feeling of heat that rushes to your face and upper body. Hot flashes can be really uncomfortable, but they usually only last a few minutes. They can happen a few times a day, a few times a week, or a few times a month.

  • Night sweats: Hot flashes that wake you up in the middle of the night.

  • Vaginal changes: The lining of your vagina may become thinner, drier, or less stretchy. This can cause dryness or discomfort during sex.

  • Urinary or bladder infections:  You may have to pee more often or get more frequent urinary tract or bladder infections.

  • Mood changes: Hormone changes can make you feel anxious, irritable, and tired. Your sex drive might change, too.

  • Weaker bones: Your bones will probably weaken during menopause. If its really bad, it can lead to osteoporosis after menopause. Getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D, and exercising for at least 30 minutes most days of the week can help you maintain bone health. 

Some people may have a long and difficult perimenopause, up to 1012 years. But most people find that the common menopause symptoms are temporary and only last 35 years.

A few common menopause symptoms may continue or even get worse when menopause is over. Your doctor or nurse can talk with you about treatment if you have symptoms that bother you.

What Symptoms Are Caused By The Reduced Levels Of Estrogen In My Body

Pin on Menopause and Perimenopause

About 75 percent of women experience hot flashes during menopause, making them the most common symptom experienced by menopausal women. Hot flashes can occur during the day or at night. Some women may also experience muscle and joint pain, known as arthralgia, or mood swings.

It may be difficult to determine whether these symptoms are caused by shifts in your hormones, life circumstances, or the aging process itself.

How Do I Know If Changes In My Periods Are Normal Perimenopausal Symptoms Or Something To Be Concerned About

Irregular periods are common and normal during perimenopause . But other conditions can cause abnormalities in menstrual bleeding. If any of the following situations apply to you, see a doctor to rule out other causes.

  • Your periods are changing to become very heavy, or accompanied by blood clots.
  • Your periods last several days longer than usual.
  • You spot or bleed after your period.
  • You experience spotting after sex.
  • Your periods occur closer together.

Potential causes of abnormal bleeding include hormonal imbalances, hormonal treatments, pregnancy, fibroids, blood-clotting problems or, rarely, cancer.

Questions To Ask Your Health Care Team

  • Could my cancer treatment cause early or sudden menopause?

  • Should I speak with a fertility specialist before beginning cancer treatment?

  • Could my cancer treatment affect my sex life? How, and for how long?

  • What signs of menopause should I look out for?

  • What are the treatment options for my menopause symptom?

  • Do you recommend hormone replacement therapy for me?

When To See A Doctor

At the onset of perimenopause, a person may wish to schedule regular doctor visits for preventive healthcare.

Around perimenopause, doctors may recommend certain health screenings that sometimes include a colonoscopy, mammogram, and blood tests.

An individual should not hesitate to seek a doctors care and advice to deal with disruptive menopausal symptoms. If vaginal bleeding occurs after menopause, a person should also seek medical attention.

What Are The Complications And Effects Of Menopause On Chronic Medical Conditions

How to know when menopause is over

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is the deterioration of the quantity and quality of bone that causes an increased risk of fracture. The density of the bone normally begins to decrease in women during the fourth decade of life. However, that normal decline in bone density is accelerated during the menopausal transition. Consequently, both age and the hormonal changes due to the menopause transition act together to cause osteoporosis. Medications to treat osteoporosis are currently available and pose less risk than hormone therapy. Therefore, hormone therapy is not recommended for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis.

Cardiovascular disease

Prior to menopause, women have a decreased risk of heart disease and stroke when compared with men. Around the time of menopause, however, a women’s risk of cardiovascular disease increases. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the U.S.

Coronary heart disease rates in postmenopausal women are two to three times higher than in women of the same age who have not reached menopause. This increased risk for cardiovascular disease may be related to declining estrogen levels, but in light of other factors, medical professionals do not advise postmenopausal women to take hormone therapy simply as a preventive measure to decrease their risk of heart attack or stroke.

What Are The Signs Of Coming To The End Of Menopause

Once you have come to the end of menopause, there are number of different signs and symptoms you might experience. However, every womans journey through menopause is unique, and not everybody will experience every one of these postmenopausal symptoms.

Hot Flashes

You might have hoped that once you had your last period, symptoms such as hot flashes would stop. However, your hormone levels can continue to fluctuate for several years after this and so hot flashes and the like can still be a problem for some women.

Although some menopausal symptoms may continue for as long as eight years after menopause, they should stop eventually. Something to look forward to at least!

Weight Gain

Fortunately, weight gain does not have to be part and parcel of menopause. You can stay in shape by eating well and exercising regularly; you just might have to work a little bit harder than before.

Increased Risk of Heart Disease

After menopause, women are at an increased risk of heart disease. This is because falling estrogen levels can increase the risk of atherosclerosis, a condition which causes hard plaques to build up on the walls of the blood vessels making them narrower and less flexible. Many women also find that their blood pressure increases following menopause, further increasing the risk of heart disease.

Menopause hair loss can be upsetting, but if you notice that your hair isnt as thick as it used to be, you are not alone.

Increased Risk of Osteoporosis

Reduced Memory

Vaginal Dryness And Discomfort

If your vagina becomes dry, painful or itchy as a result of the menopause, your GP can prescribe oestrogen treatment that’s put directly into your vagina as a pessary, cream or vaginal ring.

This can safely be used alongside HRT.

You’ll usually need to use vaginal oestrogen indefinitely, as your symptoms are likely to return when treatment stops. However, side effects are very rare.

You can also use over-the-counter vaginal moisturisers or lubricants in addition to, or instead of, vaginal oestrogen.

Read more about vaginal dryness 

We Need To Know How Menopause Changes Womens Brains

This might turn out to be a crucial window to try to prevent Alzheimers and other chronic diseases that often accompany older age.

During menopause, which marks the end of a womans menstrual cycles, her ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone, bringing an end to her natural childbearing years. But those hormones also regulate how the brain functions, and the brain governs their release meaning that menopause is a neurological process as well. Many of the symptoms of menopause cannot possibly be directly produced by the ovaries, if you think about the hot flashes, the night sweats, the anxiety, the depression, the insomnia, the brain fog, says Lisa Mosconi, an associate professor of neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine and director of its Womens Brain Initiative. Those are brain symptoms, and we should look at the brain as something that is impacted by menopause at least as much as your ovaries are.

Yet Mosconi and colleagues found that women in their study who had a particular genetic risk factor for Alzheimers disease began to develop amyloid plaques, which are linked to the disease, during perimenopause in their late 40s and early 50s earlier than previously thought. If the brain changes significantly during perimenopause, that might turn out to be a crucial window during which to try to prevent Alzheimers and other chronic diseases that often accompany older age.

Kim Tingley is a contributing writer for the magazine.

How To Know When Menopause Is Over

end of menopause

When you are going through the menopause it can be hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel, but its important to know that there is an end to it. So, this week on A.Vogel Talks Menopause I thought I would take a look at how to know when menopause is over, including how long it lasts, what are the signs that menopause is finally over and how you can feel afterwards.

Eileen Durward

Menopause And Complementary Therapies

Some women can benefit from using complementary therapies for menopause. But it is important to remember that natural herb and plant medications can have unpleasant side effects in some women, just like prescribed medications. A registered naturopath may provide long-term guidance and balance through the menopausal years.Herbal therapies can often be taken in conjunction with hormone therapy. It is important to let both your doctor and naturopath know exactly what each has prescribed, and to consult your doctor before taking any herbal treatments or dietary supplements for menopause. Some natural therapies can affect or interact with other medications you may be taking.

What Factors Influence How Long Menopause Lasts

editorial processBrian Levine, MDMedical Review Board

Although there is a usual range for how long menopause symptoms last, each woman’s journey is unique. The transition often takes about four years, but some symptoms may last longer. There are no hard and fast rules as menopause begins and ends on its own schedule.

How Long Does Perimenopause Last

The length of each stage of the menopause transition can vary for each individual. The average length of perimenopause is about four years. Some women may only be in this stage for a few months, while others will be in this transition phase for more than four years. If you have gone more than 12 months without having a period, you are no longer perimenopausal. However, if there are medications or medical conditions that may affect periods, it can be more difficult to know the specific stage of the menopause transition.

When Do Menopause Symptoms Stop

How you know you are in menopause

Midlife discomforts can plague women’s lives for years, leaving them wondering exactly how long can menopause symptoms last before finding any relief. Luckily, symptoms do not usually last a lifetime, and reprieve isn’t too far out of reach.

Continue reading to learn about how long menopause symptoms last and treatment options so that you can have a better knowledge of your reproductive health and better quality of life.

Are There Any Other Emotional Changes That Can Happen During Menopause

Menopause can cause a variety of emotional changes, including:

  • A loss of energy and insomnia.
  • A lack of motivation and difficulty concentrating.
  • Anxiety, depression, mood changes and tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Aggressiveness and irritability.

All of these emotional changes can happen outside of menopause. You have probably experienced some of them throughout your life. Managing emotional changes during menopause can be difficult, but it is possible. Your healthcare provider may be able to prescribe a medication to help you . It may also help to just know that there is a name to the feeling you are experiencing. Support groups and counseling are useful tools when dealing with these emotional changes during menopause.

How Does Menopause Affect Bone Health

The older a person is, the greater their risk of osteoporosis. A persons risk becomes even greater when they go through menopause. When your estrogen level decreases during menopause, you lose more bone than your body can replace. This makes your bones weaker and more likely to break. To keep your bones strong, its important to get enough calcium and vitamin D in your diet. These help your body absorb calcium. Your doctor can suggest ways to get more calcium through food, drink, and, possibly, a calcium supplement. They may also suggest that you take a vitamin D supplement to help your body process calcium. Ask your doctor what amount of daily calcium and vitamin D is right for you.

When Does Menopause Begin

Menopausal symptoms usually start from around age 47 years. The final menstrual period is usually about age 51 but can vary considerably. There is currently no reliable way to predict when you will experience menopause and what your menopausal symptoms will be like.

When menopause happens before 40 years it is called premature, and when it happens before 45 years it is called early. Menopause after age 45 years is considered normal and there is no upper age limit to when it can begin. However, most women have experienced menopause by age 55 years.

What Is Menopause Its A Moment In Time

Pin on Natural Perimenopause Relief

Menopause is a specific point in time. Menopause occurs when periods stop and youve gone 12 consecutive months since having your last period. Once youve hit that moment, you enter post-menopause.

Reaching menopause means that youre no longer able to bear children. Every woman except for those whove had their ovaries removed before puberty will go through menopause.

When does menopause start?

The average menopause age is around 51. But some women experience menopause in their 40s with a small percentage experiencing menopause even younger. Some women may not reach menopause until their 60s.

Theres no way to know your exact menopause age until it happens, but genetics seem to play a strong role. You may get a general idea of when to expect menopause based on when your family members went through it, particularly your mother.

Genetics arent the only thing that can impact when menopause starts. Medical factors can also influence menopause timing. When the ovaries are removed, symptoms will begin to show immediately.

Certain medical conditions like autoimmune diseases have also been associated with early menopause. Women whove undergone treatments like radiation therapy or chemotherapy are also more likely to show symptoms earlier.

Do Phytoestrogen Treatments Reduce The Number And Severity Of Hot Flushes And Are They Safe And Acceptable

Cochrane evidenceCochrane Reviews are systematic reviews. In systematic reviews we search for and summarize studies that answer a specific research question . The studies are identified, assessed, and summarized by using a systematic and predefined approach. They inform recommendations for healthcare and research. More: A Cochrane review includes 43 randomisedRandomization is the process of randomly dividing into groups the people taking part in a trial. One group will be given the intervention being tested and compared with a group which does not receive the intervention .  Morecontrolled trialsA trial in which a group is given a intervention being tested is compared with a group which does not receive the intervention . More with over 4000 women, but many were small, brief and poor quality, and looked at many different types of phytoestrogens.

There is no conclusive evidence to show that phytoestrogen supplements effectively reduce the frequency or severity of hot flushes and night sweats in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.

What Happens And How Does It Feel

For some women this loss of reproductive ability may be deeply felt, and for all women the menopause is a personal experience, not just a medical condition. However, the diminishing release of oestrogen from the ovary as women advance into their 40s is often the cause of symptoms which can be distressing and may need medical attention.

Hot flushes are the most common symptom of the menopause, occurring in three in every four menopausal women. Other common symptoms include night sweats, sleeplessness, vaginal dryness, irritated skin, more frequent urinary incontinence and urinary tract infections, low mood and a reduced interest in sex. Symptoms vary hugely in duration, severity and what impact they have on women.

All the common symptoms of the menopause are associated with a decrease in the bodys production of oestrogen. Oestrogen lack can affect many parts of the body, including the brain, causing changes in emotional well-being, and the skin, influencing its elasticity and thickness.

There is also some evidence that oestrogen deficiency is the cause of some chemical changes in the body which make women after the menopause especially vulnerable to heart disease and stroke.

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