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Do You Have Estrogen After Menopause

How Is Incontinence Treated

Taking Estrogen After Menopause: What You and Your Heart Need to Know

There are many different factors that your healthcare provider will consider when creating a treatment plan for your incontinence. The type of incontinence and the ways it affects your life are both big considerations. Your provider will also talk to you about the type of treatment you are most comfortable with. There are three main types of treatment you can explore for incontinence medications, lifestyle changes and surgery. Each option has pros and cons that your provider will discuss with you.

Medications to treat incontinence

There are quite a few medications that can reduce leakage. Some of these drugs stabilize the muscle contractions that cause problems with an overactive bladder. Other medications actually do the opposite thing relaxing muscles to allow your bladder to empty completely. Hormone replacement therapies can often involving replacing estrogen thats decreased during menopause may also help restore normal bladder function.

In many cases, medications can work very well to return normal function to the bladder. Your provider will carefully select a medication that matches your specific needs. Often, your provider will start you on a low dose of the medication and then increase it slowly. This is done to try and reduce your risks of side effects and to keep track of how well the medication is working to treat your incontinence.

Common medications that can be used to treat incontinence include:

Lifestyle changes to manage incontinence

Estrogen: Not Just Produced By Ovaries

Date:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Summary:
A research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout the entire aging process.

A University of Wisconsin-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen — a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout the entire aging process.

The new research shows that the hypothalamus can directly control reproductive function in rhesus monkeys and very likely performs the same action in women.

Scientists have known for about 80 years that the hypothalamus, a region in the brain, is involved in regulating the menstrual cycle and reproduction. Within the past 40 years, they predicted the presence of neural estrogens, but they did not know whether the brain could actually make and release estrogen.

Most estrogens, such as estradiol, a primary hormone that controls the menstrual cycle, are produced in the ovaries. Estradiol circulates throughout the body, including the brain and pituitary gland, and influences reproduction, body weight, and learning and memory. As a result, many normal functions are compromised when the ovaries are removed or lose their function after menopause.

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Does Food Play A Role

Some have suggested that menopause was much easier for Asian women than for Westernersat least while women followed traditional, mostly plant-based diets. Hot flashes have been reported by only about 10 percent of women in China,1 17.6 percent of women in Singapore,2 and 22.1 percent of women in Japan.3 In contrast, it is estimated that hot flashes are experienced by 75 percent of women over the age of 50 in the United States.4 Whether these differences might be partly due to reluctance in reporting symptoms among Asians is not entirely clear. And as Asias diets gradually westernize, these differences are likely to disappear anyway.

But we do know that, throughout their lives, Western women consume much more meat, and about four times as much fat, as women on traditional Asian rice-based diets, and only one-quarter to one-half the fiber. For reasons that have never been completely clear, a high-fat, low-fiber diet causes a rise in estrogen levels. Women on higher-fat diets have measurably more estrogen activity than do those on low-fat diets. At menopause, the ovaries production of estrogen comes to a halt. Those women who have been on high-fat diets then have a dramatic drop in estrogen levels. The drop appears to be less dramatic for Asian women who have lower levels of estrogen both before and after menopause. The resulting symptoms are much milder or even nonexistent.

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The Risks Of Oestrogen

Oral oestrogen increases the risk of blood clots . The risk increases with age and other risk factors such as obesity, previous thromboembolism, smoking and immobility. In women less than 60 years, the risk with oral oestrogen alone is 3 per 10,000 per year which is not significantly different from placebo.

  • Oral oestrogen increases the risk of stroke and the risk increases with age. Stroke risk is not significantly increased in women younger than 60 years with normal blood pressure. The risk may be lower with lower doses and the use of transdermal oestrogen .
  • Oral oestrogen is associated with an increased risk of gallbladder inflammation . There are no data regarding gel or skin patches.
  • Oestrogen alone does not appear to increase the risk of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer is primarily associated with combined oestrogen/progestogen therapy and related to the duration of use. Oestrogen alone has not been shown

to increase breast cancer risk in high quality randomized controlled trials . In a large observational study there was no significant increase in breast cancer with oestrogen only therapy for 20 years .

  • Oestrogen alone commenced at the time of menopause does not increase the risk of coronary heart disease and may decrease the risk .
  • For a fuller discussion of risk and benefit see the AMS Information Sheet Risks and Benefits of Menopausal Hormone Therapy.

Hrt Does Not Cause Weight Gain

Menopause &  Your Skin: How Your Skin Changes

Weight gain at the menopause is related to age and lifestyle factors. An increase in body fat, especially around the abdomen, can occur during menopause because of hormonal changes, although exactly why this happens is not clear. Normal age-related decrease in muscle tissue, and a decrease in exercise levels, can also contribute to weight gain.

Most studies do not show a link between weight gain and HRT use. If a woman is prone to weight gain during her middle years, she will put on weight whether or not she uses HRT.

Some women may experience symptoms at the start of treatment, including bloating, fluid retention and breast fullness, which may be misinterpreted as weight gain. These symptoms usually disappear once the therapy doses are changed to suit the individual.

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Do Postmenopausal Ovarian Cysts Go Away

Most ovarian cysts last a few weeks to a month. Others, however, can last for years. A postmenopausal ovarian cyst may remain undetected for years without any problems. Historically, doctors would recommend postmenopausal women to remove ovarian cysts to prevent any cancer threat if theyre found. Recently, however, studies show that a watchful waiting approach might be a less invasive approach. Allowing a cyst to remain if its not cancerous or isnt causing problems avoids unnecessary adverse effects from surgery.

How Will A Healthcare Provider Diagnose Hair Loss In Women What Tests Are Done

The tests performed to diagnose hair loss in women can be simple or complicated:

  • Gently pulling on your hair to see how many hairs come out.
  • Blood tests. These check for vitamin and mineral levels and hormone levels .
  • Scalp examination under a microscope and trichoscopy.
  • Scalp biopsy to remove and examine a very small piece of scalp skin.

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Eat For Hormonal Health

A healthy diet can speed healing, no matter what ails you. You can eat certain foods to support hormonal health. Always eat as many whole foods as you possibly can and avoid the processed and sugary ones. Organic veggies and fruits, lots of water and herbal teas, and fibrous foods like apples, pears, berries, avocados, beans, legumes, nuts and seeds are all beneficial for your body.

Symptoms Of Low Estrogen And How To Treat It

What You Need To Know About Your Hormones After Menopause

Estrogen is the primary hormone that sets women apart from men. While men have it in small amounts, women have far more. To stay healthy and feeling good, its important to have adequate amounts of estrogen. When were low in this particular hormone, a host of irritating symptoms typically occurs. Lets take a look at 10 symptoms of low estrogen and what we can do to treat it.

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Psychological Or Social Conditions

Numerous psychological and social theories have been proffered to explain why women may become depressed during perimenopause. Some of these are related to the following factors:

  • Change in the childbearing role

  • Loss of fertility, which may be associated with a loss of an essential meaning of life

  • Empty nest syndrome

  • The societal value of youth .

How Can I Increase My Estrogen Naturally

FoodSoybeans and the products produced from them, such as tofu and miso, are a great source of phytoestrogens . Phytoestrogens mimic estrogen in the body by binding to estrogen receptors.Flax seeds also contain high amounts of phytoestrogens. Sesame seeds are another dietary source of phytoestrogens.

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The Effects Of Menopause On The Body

Estrogen and progesterone are the primary female hormones related to reproduction. When ovarian function declines with age, ovulation doesnt occur regularly. This leads to irregular or missed periods.

Eventually, the ovaries stop ovulating altogether, and periods stop completely. This results in lower levels of estrogen and progesterone production by your ovaries.

Youve officially entered menopause when you have 12 missed periods in a row. This natural life stage typically starts around your mid-40s to mid-50s and can last for several years.

While menopause means you wont have any more periods and can no longer get pregnant, the decrease in estrogen also has several other effects on the body.

While your period may have been changing over the last several years during perimenopause, you dont technically hit menopause until your monthly period has stopped completely. This means your body stops producing eggs for fertilization.

Without the shedding of an unfertilized egg every month, theres no more menstruation.

Menopause can also affect other parts of the reproductive system. When youre no longer going through monthly cycles, you may not have any thickening of cervical mucus toward the middle of your cycle, a symptom that often signifies ovulation.

Overall vaginal dryness and a lack of libido can also occur with menopause, but these dont have to be permanent. An over-the-counter lubricant can help.

Make Sure Youre Living A Balanced Life

Do You Have To Take Hormones For Menopause

Estrogen is one powerful hormone. To keep your body and brain healthy, its essential that your estrogen levels are balanced. This may require hormone replacement therapy .

The doctors at The Association for Womens Health Care can help you find out if youre a candidate for HRT. If you suspect your estrogen may not be in balance, or if youre experiencing symptoms of menopause and would like to get them under control, contact The Association for Womens Health Care for an appointment.

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Pros & Cons Of Replacing Hormones

Since menopause is caused by a decrease in estrogen and progesterone, why not just replace them and continue on? Hormone replacement therapy is an option for many women who wish to combat the health risks that increase during their postmenopausal years. But this therapy may have its own risks.

Benefits: Estrogen therapy may relieve hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and protect against bone loss.

Risks: Estrogen-only therapy may increase your risk of breast and uterine cancer, stroke, heart disease, and deep vein thrombosis. Combine hormone therapy could cause an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke, heart disease, deep vein thrombosis, and gallbladder disease.

Talk to your doctor about the right approach to managing your health changes after menopause.

How Postmenopause Affects The Body

We dont fully appreciate the natural hormone estrogen until its gone. This humble hormone is essential for maintaining health throughout a womans body not just the reproductive system. With a decrease in estrogen, your bodys major systems can be affected too.

Heres how estrogen relates to the rest of your body once youre postmenopause.

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What Can I Do To Prevent Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis isnt entirely preventable, but you can take steps to strengthen your bones. Eating foods high in calcium like cheese, yogurt, spinach or fortified cereals can help boost calcium intake. Adding a calcium supplement can also help. Some people also need a vitamin D supplement because it helps their body absorb calcium.

How Can Hair Loss In Women Be Prevented

Can Periods Restart After Menopause?

Preventing hair loss is not possible when it is due to disease, aging, heredity or physical stressors like injuries. You can prevent hair loss caused by caustic chemicals or tight hairstyles by avoiding them. You might be able to prevent some hair loss by eating a healthy diet that provides necessary nutrients in terms of vitamins, minerals and protein. You can stop smoking.

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How Common Is Hair Loss In Women

Many people think that hair loss only affects men. However, it is estimated that more than 50% of women will experience noticeable hair loss. The most significant cause of hair loss in women is female-pattern hair loss , which affects about one-third of susceptible women, which equals out to some 30 million women in the United States.

Hormonal Changes In Menopause

As people with ovaries age, they have fewer and fewer eggs over time. They also have fewer ovarian follicles, which produce hormones that help regulate the menstrual cycle and other reproductive systems. Early on in perimenopause, the body can compensate for the loss of follicles. Over time, however, that becomes less possible.

During the early stages of menopause, there are intense fluctuations in estrogen. These fluctuations cause many of the symptoms associated with menopause, including sleep problems and hot flashes. As menopause proceeds and people move into postmenopause, estrogen levels permanently drop and stabilize at a lower level.

Testosterone levels also drop during and after menopause. However, this decline occurs more slowly than the changes in estrogen. Therefore, changes associated with reduced testosterone levels may not be as noticeable.

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Myth #: Menopause Gives You Weak Bones

Menopause and excessive bone loss do not have to go hand in hand. According to Womens Health Network bone expert Susan E. Brown, PhD On average, a woman loses 10% of her bone mass during the menopause transition an entirely normal part of the bone breakdown and build up process. After we reach our peak bone mass at age 30, we naturally experience more breaking down than building up. While most women have enough bone mass to handle this loss just fine, added risk factors like poor diet, family history and lifestyle can lead to excessive bone loss of up to 20%.

Dr. Brown also points out there are plenty of factors you can control to prevent excessive bone loss in perimenopause and menopause, including getting enough of the proper nutrients, managing extreme hormonal fluctuations, developing a bone-strengthening exercise program and reducing stress.

What Happens To Estrogen During Menopause

Everything you should know about estrogen &  soy

During women’s reproductive lives, estrogen levels are relatively consistent, guiding the menstrual cycle on a monthly basis alongside the hormone progesterone. Estrogen is produced largely by the ovaries with smaller amounts being produced by other organs.

Then, as women enter the menopausal transition, the ovaries wind down reproductive functions, and estrogen levels fluctuate unpredictably until postmenopause, which is when the hormone generally reaches consistently low levels.

As a matter of fact, after perimenopause ends, postmenopausal estrogen levels can be at 10 percent of what they are during premenopausal years.

As such, this hormonal imbalance brought on by estrogen’s fluctuations during perimenopause provokes various symptoms that are considered characteristic of this life transition.

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Prescription And Nonprescription Remedies

A number of non-hormonal remedies are available for the treatment of hot flashes. Some of these remedies are available over-the-counter but are not FDA-approved. Some prescription medications are used off label to help reduce hot flashes. Using a product “off label” means that it is not FDA-approved for the treatment of hot flashes, but is often used because it can be safe and effective for hot flash treatment.

Can Your Ovaries Hurt After Menopause Why

Typically felt below the belly button in the lower abdomen, ovarian pain can start during the period before menopause occurs, called perimenopause. During perimenopause, the areas around the ovaries and the ovaries themselves can become sensitive and painful. However, ovarian pain may continue well after menopause starts. Ovaries hurt around menopause because of hormones called prostaglandins. Prostaglandins affect pain levels and inflammation, and estrogen levels can influence the amount of prostaglandins in the uterus lining. As estrogen levels fluctuate, so do prostaglandins, thus causing pain.

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What Hormones Are Used To Treat The Symptoms Of Menopause

The hormones most commonly used to treat symptoms of menopause are estrogen and progesterone. . Often, these 2 hormones are used together, but some women are given estrogen alone. Its important to know which hormones you are talking about when looking at the risks.

Common estrogen preparations used to treat menopausal symptoms include conjugated equine estrogens and estradiol, but several forms or types of estrogen are available.

There are also many progestins available, but medroxyprogesterone acetate , is often used with an estrogen to treat menopausal symptoms. Some preparations contain both an estrogen and a progestin.

Androgens are also sometimes used to treat menopausal symptoms. This is not common, though, and because only a few studies have looked at this practice, it isnt clear how safe it is in the long run.

Tibolone is a synthetic hormone drug that can act like estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone in different tissues of the body. Because this drug isnt available in the US, its not discussed here.

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