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Do You Bleed Heavily During Menopause

Cancer In Reproductive Organs

Heavy bleeding during perimenopause / menopause

Cancer in the reproductive organs is a much less likely cause of your bleeding Nevertheless, vaginal bleeding is one of the symptoms of cervical, uterine, and vaginal cancer.

The type of tumor depends on the type of cancer a person contracts. Tumors are built up of solid, improperly developed blood vessels, when the tumors grow, these fragile blood developed blood vessels over dilate and are more susceptible to bursting. Sex can aggravate blood vessel bursting.

Excluding sexual intercourse, vaginal bleeding is a more relatively common symptom of cervical cancer. Bleeding symptoms of cervical cancer include:

  • Bleeding between periods or post-menopause
  • Heavy and long periods
  • Vaginal Discharge mixed with blood

If going to a gynecologist to be evaluated for cervical cancer, expect a Pap smear, pelvic exam, and a visual checkup. An Ob / GYN that is suspicious of cancer may examine a sample of your body tissue through.

Symptoms Of Fibroids After Menopause

The main clinical manifestations of non-regressing uterine fibroids after menopause are as follows:

  • late onset of menopause
  • spotting from the uterus
  • lack of regression of uterine fibroids in the first 1-2 years of postmenopause
  • endometrial pathology
  • ovarian pathology
  • chronic anemia in the absence of pathology of other organs and systems.

How To Bring It Up To A Healthcare Professional

Mention symptoms of perimenopause to a healthcare professional as soon as you begin noticing them. This can go a long way toward helping you get relief.

That said, theres no denying many professionals dismiss milder symptoms or seem disinterested in making the effort to understand your distress. This can be disheartening but dont feel obligated to continue seeing a doctor who doesnt respect your understanding of your own body.

If possible, consider seeking out a healthcare professional you can trust who truly listens and works to help you find relief.

If thats not an option, keep restating your concerns until they listen. Be clear and specific about:

  • symptoms you experience
  • how symptoms affect your life
  • the methods youve tried to find relief

It may help to keep a daily diary, noting:

  • physical symptoms
  • mood changes and mental health symptoms
  • self-care strategies or home remedies youve tried

Bring this diary to your appointments, so you can show your doctor.

The most important tool for navigating thoughts of death and suicide is connection and support, Botnick says.

Support might include:

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What Else Can Happen During Perimenopause

One of the first signs that you are perimenopausal is a missed period. As your estrogen and progesterone levels slowly drop, you will no longer have regular monthly periods. However, they do not simply stop altogether overnight, the process can take years, so you might not have a period for a couple of months, then all of sudden you will. You are considered officially menopausal when you havent had a single period for 12 months.

Many women feel like they are losing control as they enter this stage in their lives. Your body is transitioning and with that you might feel anxious, dizzy or even depressed. These are symptoms that arent spoken about as much amongst women, but they are often the worse, affecting your mental state and increasing stress. Not only that, but fatigue can also take-over, so if you notice a considerable dip in energy this could be why.

Some women report a more uncomfortable time during perimenopause, as opposed to menopause itself, but every womans journey is different. If youve ever wondered why some women suffer more than others, you might like to read our previous blog post on this topic.

Of course you have come to the LadyCare blog, which means we have a solution, that is proven to help up to 71% of women with 24 symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. This includes the more common symptoms such as hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings and weight gain to name just a few.

But Are You Sure Youre Even Going Through Menopause In The First Place

The Secret to Stopping Heavy Periods

A woman, close to the start of menopause, may go several months without a single period. Then she starts bleeding heavilyand she assumes that this is another period.

However, if the bleeding doesnt resemble her typical menstruation, maybe she IS in menopause. As mentioned, lab testing can show if a woman is in menopause.

During the transition into full menopause, says Dr. Tutera, it is very common to have significant variations in the timing of periods and amount of bleeding. The ovaries are just not functioning consistently day to day.

What could bleeding heavily during menopause be caused by?

Causes include: benign uterine or cervical polyps, endometrial thickening or thinning, cancer of the uterus, vagina or cervix, or cervical infection.

This list of causes, including the cancers, is not complete.

Dr. Tutera initially specialized in obstetrics and gynecology and then moved on to treating hormonal imbalances in women. He passed away in 2015.
Lorra Garrick has been covering medical, fitness and cybersecurity topics for many years, having written thousands of articles for print magazines and websites, including as a ghostwriter. Shes also a former ACE-certified personal trainer.

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Can Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Be Prevented Or Avoided

If your abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by hormonal changes, you will not be able to prevent it. But if your hormonal changes are caused by being overweight, losing weight could help. Your weight affects your hormone production. Maintaining a healthy weight can help prevent abnormal uterine bleeding.

Antidepressants May Cause Abnormal Bleeding

Increased Uterine, Gastrointestinal Bleeding Noted Among New Users

Researchers say the risk of bleeding associated with antidepressants is due to the brain chemical serotonin, a chemical messenger that plays a role in depression and anxiety.

Most antidepressants affect serotonin. Some antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, including Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft, affect this chemical more strongly than other antidepressants.

The finding is published in today’s issue of The Archives of Internal Medicine.

In addition to affecting mood, serotonin also plays a role in blood clotting. Previous studies have shown an association between the use of SSRIs and abnormal bleeding, particularly excessive uterine bleeding and stomach and intestine bleeding. But the evidence has been considered inconclusive.

For the new study, Welmoed E. E. Meijer, PhD, and colleagues in The Netherlands examined 64,000 medical records of patients that had taken antidepressants. Patients were considered “new” users if they had a prescription for at least a year but no history of prior antidepressant use.

There were 196 cases of abnormal bleeding. Nearly half were hospitalized for abnormal uterine bleeding. Stomach and intestinal bleeding accounted for 16%, brain hemorrhages accounted for 10%, and abnormal bleeding in joints, nose bleeds, and bleeding within the bladder, accounted for almost one-fifth of bleeding requiring hospitalizations.

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How Long Are Normal Perimenopause Periods

Ordinarily, your menstrual cycle occurs every 21 to 35 days and lasts from 2 to 7 days. However, perimenopause periods can last much longer. Some months, the ovaries might not produce sufficient levels of estrogen and progesterone, preventing menstruation altogether. Other months, the imbalance might cause the uterine lining to become overly thick, which means it will take longer to be shed by your body to shed.

Excessive bleeding and long periods are fairly common during perimenopause. Many women experience an increased flow and extended perimenopause periods before entering menopause.

If youve had periods that are several days longer or more frequent or heavier than usual, its a good idea to see your doctor.

Perimenopause Period Pains Bloating & More

Menopause & You: Bleeding After Menopause

Are you nearing menopause, yet occasionally experience symptoms as if you were menstruating, such as period type cramps or bloating? Its not actually that uncommon and its definitely nothing to worry about unless you are experiencing ongoing pain or you have an underlying health issue.

As you enter perimenopause, , you might notice that you are getting menstrual cramps without actually having a period. Again, this is very common and you might also experience other symptoms such as breast tenderness or changes in emotions. At this point your body is still going through a monthly cycle, but you might not have enough hormones to result in a bleed.

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Most Common Cause Of Heavy Bleeding During Perimenopause

Heavy bleeding can be caused by a lot of things, but the most common reason for women nearing menopause is the sudden spikes and drops in the level of hormones in the body. With estrogen levels in the body going on roller coaster rides, this causes an abnormality in menstruation.

Estrogen dominance is something that happens when a womans body nearing menopause just dumps all the estrogen into the system. This strong, concentrated amount of estrogen is not good for the body and will signal the body to produce a thicker than usual uterine lining every month.

This occurrence causes the heavier than normal bleeding during menopause. If left untreated, it could cause anemia, electrolyte imbalance and weakness. The best way to combat estrogen dominance that causes heavy bleeding is, the natural estrogen from plants.

Causes Of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

While in many cases it is not possible to determine the exact cause, there are a number of reasons a woman may experience abnormal uterine bleeding. Some of the known causes of abnormal uterine bleeding include:

  • spontaneous miscarriage in pregnancy
  • ectopic pregnancy lodgement of the fertilised egg in the slender fallopian tube instead of the uterine lining
  • hormonal disorders conditions such as hypothyroidism , polycystic ovarian syndrome and hyperprolactinemia can disrupt the menstrual cycle
  • ovulatory dysfunction this is when the ovary does not release an egg each month. Most commonly, this occurs at either end of a woman’s reproductive years, either during puberty or at menopause
  • endometriosis the cells lining the uterus can travel to, attach and grow elsewhere in the body, most commonly within the peritoneal cavity

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How Much Is Heavy Bleeding

It’s difficult to define exactly what a heavy period is because it varies from woman to woman. Heavy for 1 woman may be normal for another.

Most women will lose less than 16 teaspoons of blood during their period, with the average being around 6 to 8 teaspoons.

Heavy menstrual bleeding is defined as losing 80ml or more in each period, having periods that last longer than 7 days, or both.

But it’s not usually necessary to measure blood loss. Most women have a good idea of how much bleeding is normal for them during their period and can tell when this changes.

A good indication that your periods are heavy is if you:

  • are having to change your sanitary products every hour or 2
  • are passing blood clots larger than 2.5cm
  • are bleeding through to your clothes or bedding
  • need to use 2 types of sanitary product together

Not Sure What To Do Next

What are the Symptoms of Peri

If you are still concerned about bleeding after menopause, use healthdirects online Symptom Checker to get advice on when to seek medical attention.

The Symptom Checker guides you to the next appropriate healthcare steps, whether its self care, talking to a health professional, going to a hospital or calling triple zero .

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Menopause Symptoms Can Feel Like Pms

Some women develop symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome for the first time or have more acute levels of their normal PMS. These symptoms can be physical, psychological, or emotional. Most of us will have had some level of PMS during the second half of the monthly cycle over the years. Symptoms may have been getting stronger during your 30s and 40s, approaching menopause. Most common symptoms are irritability, aggression, tearfulness, mood swings, breast pain and fluid retention.

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Prolonged Heavy Bleeding During Menopause Is Common

Date:
University of Michigan
Summary:
Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition.

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition.

The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause. They say the results could impact patient care and alleviate undue concern about what to expect during this life stage that can last anywhere from 2-to-10 years.

“For most women in their 30s, menstrual periods are highly predictable. With the onset of the menopausal transition in their 40s, women’s menstrual periods can change dramatically. These dramatic changes can be disconcerting and often provoke questions about whether something is wrong,” said Sioban Harlow, U-M professor of epidemiology.

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How Much Bleeding Is Normal After Menopause

You may think you have reached menopause if you have not had a period for a few months. However, it is still possible to have a period up to a year after your last one. After 12 months without a period, any bleeding at all is not normal.

Up to 1 in 10 women experience bleeding or spotting after their menopause. In most cases the bleeding is not serious and a cause may not be found. However, it needs to be checked because sometimes it can be a sign of cervical or uterine cancer, so it is always important to see a doctor if you notice any vaginal bleeding after menopause.

Stop Suffering And Get Help For Abnormal Perimenopausal Bleeding

Menopause and You: Abnormal Bleeding

Over your reproductive years, youve come to expect a certain degree of predictability with regard to your menstrual cycle. Whether its timing, length or amount of flow, there is generally not much variation from month to month. But as you enter perimenopausethe three to five years leading up to menopauseall of this changes. And while some of these changes are manageable, some are not.

Just as every womans menstrual cycle is different, so is her experience of perimenopause, says Beverly M. Vaughn, MD, a gynecologist at Lankenau Medical Center, part of Main Line Health. Many women are caught off guard by the many changes that occur during these premenopausal years and I see a lot of women suffer through heavy bleeding even though there are very effective and minimally invasive treatments for it.

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Symptoms Of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

Symptoms include:

  • bleeding for more than eight days
  • heavy blood loss during the menstrual period for example, soaking through one or more sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several hours in a row
  • needing to change your pad or tampon during the night
  • have to change or restrict your daily activities due to your heavy bleeding
  • bleeding or spotting between periods
  • cramping and pain in the lower abdomen
  • fatigue
  • any vaginal bleeding after menopause.

If you think you may be experiencing heavy menstrual bleeding, you may find it useful to keep a pictorial blood loss assessment chart this can help you give your doctor an idea of how heavy your period is.

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Treatment

There are several treatment options for abnormal bleeding. Your treatment will depend on the cause of your bleeding, your age, and whether you want to get pregnant in the future. Your doctor will help you decide which treatment is right for you. Or, if your doctor decides that a hormone imbalance is causing your abnormal bleeding, you and your doctor may decide to wait and see if the bleeding improves on its own. Some treatment options include the following:

Intrauterine device . Your doctor may suggest an IUD. An IUD is a small, plastic device that your doctor inserts into your uterus through your vagina to prevent pregnancy. One type of IUD releases hormones. This type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell your doctor if this happens to you.

Birth control pills. Birth control pills contain hormones that can stop the lining of your uterus from getting too thick. They also can help keep your menstrual cycle regular and reduce cramping. Some types of birth control pills, especially the progestin-only pill can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some women. Let your doctor know if the pill youre taking doesnt control your abnormal bleeding.

If youre having heavy bleeding, your doctor may perform a D& C both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D& C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

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What Causes Ovary Pain During Menopause

Perimenopause is a period of up to about a year when your periods will start to taper off. Youll still have some cramps and bleeding. This signifies that your periods arent quite over with. Complicating the matter is the fluctuations of the hormones estrogen and progesterone. This can add to your pain and discomfort. Youll likely experience other menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, night sweats, and mood swings or irritability.

There are several conditions that can cause pain in the ovaries during or after menopause. Endometriosis is a condition that causes tissue thats normally only found in the uterus to grow in your ovaries or pelvis. Each time you get a period this tissue will swell and cause pain. While most women stop after menopausal symptoms appear, some women report continuing to have symptoms of endometriosis. If you take hormone therapy, estrogen will make the symptoms worse.

Cancer of the uterus or ovary can cause abdominal pain, but this will also be accompanied by other symptoms like unexplained weight loss, abdominal bloating, vaginal bleeding, and fatigue.

Uterine fibroid can also be a source of abdominal pain. These growths, usually non-cancerous form in the wall of the uterus. Most fibroid begin earlier in life, but it is possible for them to form in women during their 50s. Although fibroid usually stop growing or shrink, many women report problems after their periods have stopped.

Sonya Collins Brunilda Nazario, MD

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