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Can Your Period Come Back After Menopause

What Other Changes Should You Expect

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Your period evolves in a number of ways once youve entered perimenopause. While some women have perimenopausal periods closer together, others might notice them occurring further apart. Further changes in your menstrual cycle after 40 often include:

  • Heavier periods: Your flow may become more intense over time. If bleeding is unusually heavy, however, be sure to consult your doctor.
  • Lighter periods: Inversely, a lot of women experience decreased flow for up to a year before their periods stop completely.
  • Skipped periods: Anovulatory cycles are another possibility during perimenopause. Keep in mind, though, that youre still fertile at this stage. So if youve recently had sex and missed your period, consider taking a pregnancy test.
  • Longer or shorter periods: Perhaps your period has always lasted for 4 days, but now its 2 or 6 days. You might even experience a random combination of both shorter and longer cycles while in perimenopause. This, too, is a fairly common occurrence.

Can Stress Cause Postmenopausal Bleeding

As we women age, our bodies go through some drastic and remarkable changes. After the childbearing years, the 40s and the 50s, the female body begins to change away from procreation as the production of reproductive hormones naturally begins to decline. This phase of a womans life is called menopause and is signaled by 12 continuous months since the last menstrual cycle.

The average age in the United States for women to start menopause is around 51 years of age. There are three phases of menopause that women typically go through and they are perimenopause , menopause, and then postmenopause .

Many questions surround this phase of female life, and for the purpose of this article, we are going to look at the postmenopause phase and a common question that arises often.

When Does Perimenopause Start

The average age of menopause is 51, and perimenopause symptoms typically begin about four years before your final period. Most women start to notice perimenopause symptoms in their 40s. But perimenopause can happen a little earlier or later, too. The best predictor of when your final period will be is the age at which your mother entered menopause .

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The Diagnostic Process May Involve Multiple Steps

Even though postmenopausal bleeding can have a number of different causes, your doctors first objective is to rule out potential cancers.

Well usually do a physical exam to look for blood or masses, such as fibroids, followed by an ultrasound to see how thick a patients uterine lining is, Mantia-Smaldone explained. A postmenopausal womans uterine lining should be quite thin, since she isnt menstruating.

Endometrial cancer can cause the lining of the uterus to thicken. If your uterine lining appears thicker than normal, your doctor will recommend a biopsy, in which a sample of your uterine lining is removed and examined under a microscope.

Looking Beyond Our Diets To Balance Our Hormones

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Our healthy lifestyle decisions dont need to end with food. Walking, gentle yoga and meditation are great stress reducers. Even getting out into the sun and listening to the birds singing can help your body in amazing ways. Dont forget that our stress hormones play a major role in making us unhappy after 60. They also prevent us from losing weight, which, in turn, stops us from exploring the world.

Finally, Julie reminds us to take the time to pamper ourselves. Take a hot lavender bath. Relax with some candles and appreciate some me time. Be kind to your body and it will pay you back with many years of healthy life on this amazing planet we call home.

What natural solutions have calmed your postmenopausal hormones? Have you found any specific foods that helped? What advice would you give to the other women in the community who are struggling with their postmenopausal hormones? Please join the conversation.

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It Might Be Worth Seeing A Specialist

Your gynecologist should be able to perform your initial evaluation. But, if he or she suspects that your bleeding might be related to cancer, its important to see a gynecologic oncologist, Mantia-Smaldone said.

Endometrial cancer is usually treated with surgery that includes a hysterectomy, which may be followed by radiation and/or chemotherapy. Because gynecologic oncologists deal with female reproductive cancers every day, they have more experience operating on cancers, staging them correctly, and determining the best course of therapy. And that can add up to a more successful treatment outcome.

Do I Have The Early Signs Of Menopause

It’s all about your flow. Period changeswhether they are further apart or closer together longer or shorter, heavier or lighterare the first indicator that you have entered perimenopause , the time frame of hormonal changes a woman goes through leading up to actually completing her period . If you begin having perimenopausal period changes in, say, your late thirties or early forties, its no reason to panic, because menopause itself can still be a decade away.

To clarify: Perimenopause is actually the first part of menopause but has only recently been separated from “menopause” in terms of how people talk about them . So, it follows that the hormonal fluctuations that eventually lead to menopause begin in perimenopause. Perhaps nix this last sentence?

Speaking of those wacky hormones Shifts in the female hormones estrogen and progesterone may cause a wide array of symptoms, ranging from physical to psychological, that can sometimes take women by surprise: Initially, you may think that symptoms such as trouble sleeping, mood swings, weight gain, or a lack of interest in sex are a reaction to stress or living a busy life, as opposed to the natural result of menopauses age-related hormonal shifts.

How to know what’s going on with you? When these symptoms are on their own, they may have other causes, but if they are regularly occurring along with period changes that don’t have any other explanation, you are likely in perimenopause.

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When To Seek Medical Advice

Although perimenopause is an inevitable part of every womans life, its still essential to see your gynecologist for an annual checkup. Theyll be able to assess your chances of developing menopause-related conditions and advise you on how to manage your symptoms.

However, should you notice any of the following warning signs, please seek medical attention right away.

  • Side effects of hormone treatment
  • Periods less than 21 days apart
  • Bleeding between periods

The Most Important Part Of Post

Menopause and You: Abnormal Bleeding

Along with the physical changes that occur after menopause, women may need to improve their health care routines.

Postmenopausal women are at greater risk for heart disease, so redirect your diet toward low-fat foods and lower your salt intake this reduces the risk of heart attack and atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaque builds up on the insides of the arteries.

As part of your routine check-ups, you should have a blood test at a minimum of every five years until age 50, and then at regular intervals. Your doctor will recommend what that interval should be based on how high your cholesterol is, if you are on cholesterol treatment, and on other cardiovascular risk factors that you may have, such as hypertension or obesity.

Women also should have their bone density checked once every two years to spot early signs of osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones. Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk for this condition: Research shows that up to 20 percent of bone loss can occur in the first five years of menopause.

Estrogen is one of the best stimulators of bone growth, Audlin says. The risk of osteoporosis is very low before menopause, but post-menopausally, fractured hips and problems related to bone density are very likely.

Women ages 50 and up should consume at least 1,200 milligrams of calcium every day to maintain bone health. This can be accomplished with supplements, by consuming calcium-rich foods like milk, or a combination of the two.

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There Will Be Blood: Women On The Shocking Truth About Periods And Perimenopause

The menopause brings an end to menstruation but in the lead-up, many women experience periods that can disrupt their lives and careers

If Emma Pickett needs to make a long journey, she checks her calendar very carefully. She will often take an emergency change of clothes when she goes out, and if giving a lecture for work, has to ensure it is no longer than half an hour. Yet she rarely hears anyone talk about the reason so many older women secretly go to all this trouble why theyve started to stick to black trousers, give up the sports they loved, or plan days out especially with children meticulously.

If you have a bunch of 12-year-olds in the car, you cant say: Sorry chaps, Im just bleeding heavily today, says Pickett, a 48-year-old breastfeeding counsellor and author of The Breast Book, who also happens to be among the one in five British women who suffer from heavy periods in the run-up to menopause . You can talk about hot flushes, make a joke about it. But because menstrual blood is gross in our society, theres no conversation about it. There must be women round the world just pretending they need to dash off for some other reason.

No one says erectile dysfunction is just part of mens lives. We say this is a typical thing and theres treatment

Ive come across women who are having extended sick leave because they didnt feel able to manage their bleeding

Things Everyone Experiencing Medically

For most people who get periods, menopause may seem like a far-off cloud on the horizon an unpleasant experience we all know well go through someday, but until then, its easier not to think too hard about it.

Menopause is the term for the time when your body starts producing less estrogen, which causes you to stop menstruating. It usually starts in your 40s or 50s. If you have an illness that affects your reproductive organs, however, your treatment might cause menopause earlier than normal. This process is called medication-induced menopause , and it can be a confusing, frustrating experience, made more difficult by the fact that it piggybacks on top of your other medical issues.

There are a few ways medical treatment could induce menopause. One way is to have surgery to remove your ovaries, which is called oophorectomy. If both your ovaries are removed, you will enter menopause. Or, you could undergo treatment that prevents your ovaries from working correctly and producing estrogen, thus stopping you from ovulating and having a period.

Some reasons for either of these scenarios could be:

Deciding to undergo treatment-induced menopause can be a scary experience, and fill you with more questions than answers. We spoke to Leena Nathan, an OB/GYN at UCLA, to answer some of the most common questions you might have about surgical or medication-induced menopause.

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How Can You Alleviate Perimenopausal Symptoms

Some women deal with the symptoms of perimenopause, and some women seek treatment for specific health concerns. Women with heavy bleeding, periods that last longer than seven days, spotting between periods or cycles that are less than 21 days should contact a doctor.

Typically, perimenopause is a gradual transition, and no particular test indicates what is happening to the body. Hormone therapy, vaginal estrogen treatments and antidepressants can help treat perimenopausal symptoms.

Start by identifying what’s bothering you most and then working with your doctor to address it. There are steps you can take to feel better. Lifestyle changes that can make a big impact in easing perimenopausal symptoms and improving your overall health include:

  • Yoga

What If You Want To Get Pregnant After You’ve Hit Menopause

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Okay, so let’s say you’ve already hit menopausemeaning you haven’t had a period in 12 months or morebut you would still like to get pregnant. Luckily, if that’s your choice, science is on your side through a process called in vitro fertilization .

According to the US National Library of Medicine , IVF is essentially the joining of a woman’s egg with a man’s sperm, outside of the woman’s body . In women who are of childbearing age, there are five steps to IVF: stimulation, egg retrieval, insemination and fertilization, embryo culture, and embryo transfer. However, because women who have already gone through menopause are not producing eggs, they do not need to go through the first two steps, and will instead have to use eggs from a donor.

From there, it’s like any other IVF pregnancy: Once a fertilized egg divides and become an embryo outside of the body, per the NLM, it’s placed inside the woman’s womb, where she can carry the embryo, then fetus, to term.

The bottom line: If you havent yet reached menopause but are perimenopausal, you can definitely still get pregnant. But if youve already hit menopause when you decide you want to consider motherhood, its not necessarily too late” for that, either.

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Not Sure What To Do Next

If you are still concerned about bleeding after menopause, use healthdirects online Symptom Checker to get advice on when to seek medical attention.

The Symptom Checker guides you to the next appropriate healthcare steps, whether its self care, talking to a health professional, going to a hospital or calling triple zero .

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Menopause

Women may have different signs or symptoms at menopause. Thats because estrogen is used by many parts of your body. As you have less estrogen, you could have various symptoms. Many women experience very mild symptoms that are easily treated by lifestyle changes, like avoiding caffeine or carrying a portable fan to use when a hot flash strikes. Some women dont require any treatment at all. Other symptoms can be more problematic.

Here are the most common changes you might notice at midlife. Some may be part of aging rather than directly related to menopause.

Change in your period. This might be what you notice first. Your periods may no longer be regular. They may be shorter or last longer. You might bleed more or less than usual. These are all normal changes, but to make sure there isnt a problem, see your doctor if:

  • Your periods come very close together
  • You have heavy bleeding
  • Your periods last more than a week
  • Your periods resume after no bleeding for more than a year

Vaginal health and bladder control. Your vagina may get drier. This could make sexual intercourse uncomfortable. Or, you could have other health problems, such as vaginal or bladder infections. Some women also find it hard to hold their urine long enough to get to the bathroom. This loss of bladder control is called incontinence. You may have a sudden urge to urinate, or urine may leak during exercise, sneezing, or laughing.

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Ovarian And Uterine Cancers

Cancer of the ovary or uterus can cause abdominal cramps. Your risk for these cancers increases in your 50s and beyond. Cramps alone arent reason to assume you have cancer. Women who have cancer usually have other symptoms along with cramps, such as:

  • vaginal bleeding
  • fatigue
  • unexplained weight loss

Any worrisome symptoms warrant a visit to your doctor just to make sure theyre not due to something serious.

You may be more likely to get one of the conditions that causes cramps after menopause if you:

  • took estrogen for menopause symptoms
  • have a family history of ovarian or uterine cancer
  • got your first period before age 12
  • started menopause after age 52
  • used an IUD to prevent pregnancy

Think about whether you have any of these risk factors. Then, discuss them with your doctor.

How Long Are Normal Perimenopause Periods

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Ordinarily, your menstrual cycle occurs every 21 to 35 days and lasts from 2 to 7 days. However, perimenopause periods can last much longer. Some months, the ovaries might not produce sufficient levels of estrogen and progesterone, preventing menstruation altogether. Other months, the imbalance might cause the uterine lining to become overly thick, which means it will take longer to be shed by your body to shed.

Excessive bleeding and long periods are fairly common during perimenopause. Many women experience an increased flow and extended perimenopause periods before entering menopause.

If youve had periods that are several days longer or more frequent or heavier than usual, its a good idea to see your doctor.

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No Period For Over A Year

Now, for some women, they might find that they have got to a year or even a year and a bit without a period, and suddenly they get one back again. And this is very often the time when they can get a little bit worried. Some schools of thought say that you are through the menopause once you have not had a period for a year. In our experience, we find that a number of women will get periods back, or they’ll get the odd one back after a year or more.

Postmenopausal Bleeding Is Never Normal

Whether its light spotting or a heavier flow, vaginal bleeding after menopause can signal potential health problems.

It should always be brought up with your provider, said Gina M. Mantia-Smaldone, MD, a gynecologic oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center. And the sooner, the better. Rather than waiting for your next planned checkup, give your gynecologist a call quickly to schedule an evaluation.

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