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Can You Have Menopause In Your 20s

How Sex Changes After Menopause

Average age for Menopause and signs you are going through it – Dr. Sukirti Jain

With no need to worry about getting your period, becoming pregnant or being walked in on by your kids, your postmenopausal sex life should be stellar, right? It can be good, but dont expect it to be the same type of sex you were having in your 20s, says Chris Kraft, Ph.D., director of clinical services at the Sex and Gender Clinic in the department of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

While you may have greater freedom at home, this is also a stage of life with a lot of changes that can affect your intimacy, he says. Youre redefining your roles and your relationship as the kids go off to college and your careers wind down. And youre also physically changing.

Your Nipples Will Get Darker

As your boobs get bigger during pregnancy, the area around your nipples will too. They might also get darker. And itâs all due to those hormonal changes.

âAn increase in estrogen and progesterone causes pigmentation changes in the nipples and areolae,â Dr. Sherry Ross, MD, an OB/GYN and womenâs health expert at Providence Saint Johnâs Health Center, tells Bustle. âYou will begin to see these color changes and see veins under the breasts to become more noticeable as pregnancy progresses.â

Older Women Still Suffer From Hot Flashes And Night Sweats Years After Menopause Study Finds

Date:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Women still have hot flashes and night sweats years after menopause, a new study finds. Hot flashes and night sweats are the main physical signs of the menopause, however their prevalence, frequency, severity and duration vary considerably.

Women still have hot flushes and night sweats years after menopause, finds a new study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

Hot flushes and night sweats are the main physical signs of the menopause, however their prevalence, frequency, severity and duration vary considerably.

The average age of the menopause in US and European women is 50-51 years and it is generally assumed that HF/NS last between 2 to 5 years.

This study looked at 10,418 postmenopausal women aged between 54 and 65.

The average age of the participating women was 59 and the majority were white, living in urban localities and of slightly above average socioeconomic status.

The study looked at the impact of age, BMI, hysterectomy, hormone therapy use, lifestyle and mood on women’s experience of HF/NS.

The participating women completed a questionnaire, which included sociodemographics, weight and height, and medical history. Three and a half years later, they were sent a follow up questionnaire asking them about lifestyle factors, skirt size at age 20, current skirt size, hot flushes and night sweats and current hormone therapy use.

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Are There Treatments For The Menopause

If your symptoms are severe, theres treatment available which could help. This includes hormone replacement therapy , which replaces oestrogen to alleviate symptoms, creams for vaginal dryness, and cognitive behaviour therapy to help with mood changes. Speak to your doctor about the risks and benefits of different treatments.

Changes To Your Periods

Six Natural Treatments for Menopause

The first sign of the menopause is usually a change in the normal pattern of your periods.

You may start having either unusually light or heavy periods.

The frequency of your periods may also be affected. You may have them every 2 or 3 weeks, or you may not have them for months at a time.

Eventually, you’ll stop having periods altogether.

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Ask Your Doctor About Testosterone

Testosterone replacement has long been used as a solution for men with a waning libidoand it can help rev up your own sex drive as well. Still, not all doctors are OK with prescribing synthetic versions of this main male hormone . Testosterone is by no means a cure-all and can come with side effects like acne and thinning hair. Luckily, newer remedies to enhance libido are being worked on even as we speak, Dr. Minkin says.

S: Menopause & Sex For Pleasure

White mentions that once a woman has gone through menopause, her sex drive might increase significantly. You get to have sex just for pleasure, and adult children leaving the nest means you get more time with your partner.

However, some women go through a period of mourning once they know they cannot have children anymore. For them, its an emotional time that may make it difficult to engage sexually with their partner.

The CDC has reported a 20 percent increase in STI rates in the 45-plus age group, something aging women should keep in mind as well.

Although some consequences of STIs, like infertility, are not an issue past menopause, they are still a major concern, says White. Other health conditions like diabetes, arthritis and heart disease may also interfere with sexual activity. Speaking with your doctor about these conditions is the best way to maintain your overall and sexual health, she advises.

A common complaint of postmenopausal women is vaginal dryness. Vaginas are use it or lose it. The less you have sex, the more painful it will be, White explains. She recommends engaging in regular sexual activity to stay healthy and pain-free.

More: 6 Causes of Vaginal Odor Because No, Youre Not Alone

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S: Not Out Of The Woods Yet

Few women keep having children once they hit 40, but pregnancy still remains a risk of sexual activity. Until youve gone through menopause, you can still get pregnant. Thats why once your family is complete, you should consider a long-acting or permanent form of birth control, says White.

The mythical sexual peak of the 40s is something some women may look forward to. White explains this is mostly due to children being older and more independent, so you have more space to be you. But women in their 40s also have to contend with the effects of aging, and this may negatively affect their sex drive. Accept the signs of aging on your body: stretch marks, C-section scars, she says. Fighting aging is not conducive to feeling sexually free.

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An Early First Menstrual Period May Lead To Premature Menopause

How to have great sex after menopause

How do you know if you’re starting perimenopause?

The most telling symptom is changes in your menstrual cycle, says psychiatrist Hadine Joffe, the executive director of the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“It’s the menstrual cycle pattern that really defines this lead-up to menopause,” she says. During perimenopause, periods “might be shorter, then a long one, or then a skipped one, or then the flow might be different,” says Joffe.

There’s no blood or hormone test that can “diagnose” perimenopause. Joffe says a hormone test isn’t helpful because hormonal cycles become erratic and unpredictable during this stage.

“There’s not really one point in time when a hormone test is done that can be definitive,” she says. Even if you took several tests over time, “you might get a very different readout.”

Surprisingly, sometimes doctors aren’t prepared to help women recognize the start of this life phase. Edrie was upset at her doctors’ responses â or lack thereof. “I felt so disappointed in the medical industry. How many women has my OB/GYN seen and not recognized the symptoms of perimenopause?”

What symptoms to expect

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What Causes Hot Flashes And Sweating During Menopause

Ellen Sarver Dolgen, Coronado, Calif.-based author of Shmirshky: The Pursuit of Hormone Happiness, found her life thrown upside down when perimenopause began in her late 40s. Her first hot flash happened while she was in a business meeting with all men.

âI felt a flush of heat come over me but I didnât want to pay much attention to it,â she told WebMD. But when she stood up she felt sweat dripping down the inseam of her pants. âThank goodness I carry a big purse because I think it makes my hips look smaller,â she says. She used her purse to hide the wet mark on her pants as she left the meeting. âIt was absolutely mortifying.â

Doctors think hot flashes and night sweats are a result of fluctuating or decreasing estrogen levels. When menstrual cycles finally stop, estrogen levels drop fairly dramatically, Omicioli says.

The drop may impact a part of the brain that regulates body temperature. We all have a thermal neutral zone, which means our body temperature stays stable even when the temperature around us changes slightly. Theoretically, a drop in estrogen levels may narrow the thermal neutral zone, so that small changes in outside temperature cause a rise in body heat.

Your body is programmed to keep your core temperature the same, so when the air temperature rises, blood pours into blood vessels in your skin. Youâll become flushed and start to sweat.

There are a couple of other theories about why menopause and excessive sweating tend to go hand in hand.

Responses To Loss Of Fertility

For some women, early or premature menopause can take away the possibility of becoming a mother. Some women have said, ‘I wasn’t sure if I even wanted children’, or, ‘I didn’t know if I wanted more children’, but when the power to make that decision is taken away, it can seem unfair. Early or premature menopause can mean the longed-for role of motherhood might not happen or, if it happens, it may not be in the way you anticipated. How this feels and the impact it has will depend on your individual circumstances, support networks and coping skills.

Some women with early or premature menopause feel they have to take on a role they did not expect until they were in their 50s that of a menopausal woman. They might even experience menopause before their mother.

Sometimes we have many roles, which we overlook when we focus strongly on wanting to fulfil one particular one. Some women forget they are also partners, daughters, sisters, friends, aunties, granddaughters, workers, neighbours, caregivers. Thinking about these other roles does not necessarily take away all the pain of loss, but it can help to shift the focus.

There are also other constructive ways to think about your role in life. For example, if you think your role is to be a mother, explore the steps you can take to achieve this perhaps donor eggs or adoption are options. It can be helpful to seek counselling to help you with your decision-making.

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Going Through Menopause In Your 20s And 30s Sucks

  • Snap

“I’m self-conscious of sweating. Now I have to think about what clothes I’m going to wear. One day I thought I’d be fine and I wore a pale grey T-shirt to work and that was a disaster. The hot flushes are crazythey come out of nowhere at any time and I’m suddenly drenched in sweat.”

Sophie is 31 years old. She works as a television producer at an advertising agency in England. Like many young professionals, her priorities include her career, a mortgage, maybe marriage. She didn’t plan to add menopause to that list.

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The Londoner suffers from severe endometriosis. Her endometriumthe cells that line her wombhave migrated to other parts of her body. In Sophie’s case, that means her uterus and bowels. These cells follow her menstrual cycle, building and then breaking up and bleeding when she has her period. But unlike regular cells in the womb that are shed during menstruation, the excess blood has no way of being released and leads to chronic pain, heavy periods, inflammation, and the formation of scar tissue.

In order to prepare for an operation to have this excess endometrium cut out, Sophie was injected with Zoladex, a man-made hormone used to effectively switch off her period for three months. This will tame the endometrium, making it less bloody and easier to manage.

They did some blood tests and said, ‘Right, you’ve just been through menopause. That’s it. We can’t do anything about it. Off you go.’

How Is Premature Menopause Treated

Phytoclim

The symptoms and health risks of premature menopause, as well as the emotional issues that may result from it, can be managed with the methods similar to those used for natural menopause. Women dealing with infertility that is brought on by premature menopause may want to discuss their options with their doctor or with a reproductive specialist.

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Menopause And Excessive Sweating: What You Can Do

Some changes to your regular routine may help cool hot flashes.

Work on your weight. Women who are overweight or obese are more likely to have frequent hot flashes, Omicioli says. A study of 338 overweight or obese women found that those who lost weight over 6 months had a bigger improvement in hot flashes than those who didnât lose weight.

Exercise. Although studies havenât been conclusive, itâs thought that regular physical exercise lowers hot flash frequency.

Stop smoking. Several studies have linked smoking to hot flashes. One study found that heavy smokers were four times more likely to have hot flashes than women who never smoked.

Include soy in your diet. According to the National Center for Complemetary and Alternative Medicine, results of studies showing that soy reduces hot flashes has been inconsistent. To see if it works for you, you might try adding two to three servings of soy to your diet, Omicioli says. Try soybeans, tofu, tempeh, or miso.

Stock up on tanks and cardigans. Wear lightweight clothes and dress in layers so you can shed heavier clothing when a hot flash strikes. Wearing a material at night that wicks away moisture may help you sleep

Control the air temperature. Lower the heat, run the air conditioning, open a window, or run a fan during the day and while you sleep.

Pay attention to potential triggers. Alcohol, caffeine, and spicy food may trigger hot flashes in some women.

When Treating Your Lady Bits Right Knowledge Is Power

Just as everything changes with age, your vagina does, too. While natural shifts in pelvic floor strength and vulvar skin thickness dont occur overnight, you just might be able to be more prepared for those changes by being aware of when and what goes down.

We consulted womens health experts and trusted resources to tell you how your vagina changes throughout your lifetime and what you can do to keep it in tip-top shape. Whether youre 20 or 65, wondering about pubic hair or pregnancy, heres a decade-by-decade guide with your vagina in mind.

, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

Although more and more people are waiting until their 30s to have a child, scientific literature states that, if based on optimal fertility and overall health outcomes, yours 20s may be the better time to conceive. We spoke with Kara Earthman, a womens health nurse practitioner , to get a better understanding of the vagina during this decade.

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Induced Premature Menopause Or Early Menopause

Induced menopause may result from premenopausal bilateral oophorectomy or from cancer treatments including chemotherapy and radiation. Premature menopause from these causes has increased over time because of the improved success in the treatment of cancer in children, adolescents, and reproductive-age women. Similarly, the practice of prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy at the time of hysterectomy has increased over time . However, evidence for the long-term risks and adverse health outcomes following induced menopause is starting to accumulate.

Induced Menopause Following Prophylactic Bilateral Oophorectomy

Would You Want to Know When You’ll Go Through the Menopause? | Loose Women

Approximately 1 in 9 women aged 35â45 years has undergone hysterectomy, with 40 percent undergoing bilateral oophorectomy at the same time, resulting in the abrupt onset of menopause . The practice of prophylactic oophorectomy has increased over time and more than doubled between 1965 and 1990 . Meanwhile, reports now link induced menopause from bilateral oophorectomy with serious health consequences including premature death, cardiovascular and neurologic disease, and osteoporosis, in addition to menopausal symptoms, psychiatric symptoms, and impaired sexual function.

4.2.1. Mortality and cardiovascular disease

The Mayo Clinic Cohort Study of Oophorectomy and Aging involved a population-based sample of 4,780 women and reported increased all-cause mortality in women who underwent prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before age 45 years . The increased mortality was mainly observed in women who did not take estrogen after the surgery and up until age 45 years . Cardiovascular mortality was also increased in the women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 45 years and did not take estrogen .

In summary, data consistently show an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy inducing premature menopause or early menopause. Estrogen replacement proximate to bilateral oophorectomy appears to be particularly important for reducing premature coronary heart disease and death in this group of women.

4.2.2. Neurologic outcomes

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Sex: The Story Of Your Body

The course of our sexual lives is marked by major changes in our bodies: puberty, pregnancy, child-rearing and menopause. The key to a healthy sex life across the decades is to understand these changes and how they can influence our sexual health. Knowledge and compassion for yourself and your aging body are the keys to great sex for as long as you want it.

A version of this article was originally published in January 2018.

There Might Be A Larger Gap Between Your Breasts

Aesthetically speaking, if your boobs were closer together when you were younger, you might notice that they start to sit farther apart as you get older says Dr. Mary Claire Haver, M.D., a board-certified OB/GYN and culinary medicine specialist. Again, any change in size or appearance is often hormone-related. âOver time, your breasts may shrink,â Haver tells Bustle. âWhen estrogen levels drop, your breast tissue loses elasticity and becomes dehydrated. Your breasts may shrink up to a cup size as a result of this.â

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