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HomeFactsCan You Go Through Menopause Without A Uterus

Can You Go Through Menopause Without A Uterus

Other Drugs Used For Menopausal Symptoms

What to Expect During Perimenopause

Despite its risks, hormone therapy appears to be the most effective treatment for hot flashes. There are, however, nonhormonal treatments for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms.

Antidepressants

The antidepressants known as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors are sometimes used for managing mood changes and hot flashes. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine is approved to treat moderate-to-severe hot flashes associated with menopause. Other SSRIs and similar antidepressant medicines are used “off-label” and may have some benefit too. They include fluoxetine , sertraline , venlafaxine , desvenlafaxine , paroxetine , and escitalopram .

Gabapentin

Several small studies have suggested that gabapentin , a drug used for seizures and nerve pain, may relieve hot flashes. This drug is sometimes prescribed “off-label” for treating hot flash symptoms. However, in 2013 the FDA decided against approving gabapentin for this indication because the drug demonstrated only modest benefit. Gabapentin may cause:

  • Drowsiness

The Cons: Reasons To Lean Against Hrt After Surgical Menopause

  • Your menopausal symptoms aren’t bothering you, or other treatments work fine. Some women don’t have very severe symptoms after surgical menopause and don’t want or need treatment. Even if you do have acute symptoms, HRT is not the only way to control them. Other drugs or lifestyle changes can help. Talk to your doctor.
  • You’re 50 or older. Many women who go into surgical menopause at 50 or older — the natural time of menopause – decide not to get HRT. That’s because their supply of estrogen would naturally drop during menopause anyway. There is some evidence that the older you are when you start HRT, the higher the cardiovascular risks – at least initially.
  • You have liver disease. Estrogen pills can put a lot of stress on the liver. So if you have liver disease, your doctor may not want you to take oral HRT. Other ways of getting estrogen – like patches and gels – bypass the liver and are safer options.
  • You’re concerned about the side effects. HRT can also cause symptoms of its own. Many resemble the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome — swollen and painful breasts, headaches, and nausea.
  • You’re at a higher risk of health problems like:

o Strokes. Hormone therapy can increase the risk of stroke, although your odds are still very low.

o Blood clots. Oral estrogen, at least, may also raise the risk of blood clots. Estrogen patches and creams may pose a lower risk, but that’s still unclear.

Effects On The Symptoms Of Menopause

Menopause and perimenopause can cause various noticeable changes.

According to The Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research, about 25% of people entering into perimenopause experience heavy periods. This is due to significant fluctuations in hormone levels.

The Mirena coil can help lighten periods in people who experience heavy bleeding. Some find that this type of coil stops their periods altogether. If this occurs, it may be harder to know when menopause has begun.

However, because the Mirena coil contains no estrogen, it does not affect the symptoms of a reduction in estrogen as the body goes through menopause.

Meanwhile, the Mirena coil may cause additional symptoms during menopause because it contains progestogen, a version of the hormone progesterone.

This means that a person with a Mirena coil may experience symptoms such as:

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What Are The Effects Of Early Or Premature Menopause

Women who go through menopause early may have or similar to those of regular menopause.

But some women with early or premature menopause may also have:

  • Higher risk of serious health problems, such as and , since women will live longer without the health benefits of higher estrogen levels. Talk to your doctor or nurse about steps to lower your risk for these health problems.
  • More severe menopause symptoms. Talk to your doctor or nurse about to help with symptoms if they affect your daily life.
  • Sadness or over the early loss of fertility or the change in their bodies. Talk to your doctor if you have symptoms of depression, including less energy or a lack of interest in things you once enjoyed that lasts longer than a few weeks. Your doctor or nurse can recommend specialists who can help you deal with your feelings. Your doctor or nurse can also discuss options, such as adoption or donor egg programs, if you want to have children.

Are There Any Risks Related To Hormone Therapy

Hysterectomy &  Surgical Menopause

Like most prescribed medications, there are risks for hormone therapy. Some known health risks include:

  • Endometrial cancer .
  • Gallstones and gallbladder issues.

Going on hormone therapy is an individualized decision. Discuss all past medical conditions and your family history with your healthcare provider to understand the risks versus benefits of hormone therapy for you.

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What Can My Health Professional Do To Help With These Symptoms

HRT is very effective at reducing menopause symptoms so starting HRT is the first thing your medical professional will offer to do. Its not clear from research when is the best time to start HRT for women with induced menopause. There can be a concern about the hormones keeping some areas of endometriosis active so sometimes it is not started for 3 to 6 months after induced menopause. However, if started immediately it can prevent bone loss and reduce menopause symptoms. This will be discussed with you.

The best HRT for women under the age of natural menopause with endometriosis contains at least two hormones, estrogen and progesterone, and is given continuously with no breaks. This can be given as tablets, patches or gel and sometimes alongside a hormone containing coil depending on what you would like and your situation. This combined HRT should be given for at least the first few years after removal of the ovaries but may be changed to oestrogen-only HRT later as it may have a better safety profile for women over the age of natural menopause. Ideally HRT should be continued until at least the age of 51 for all women in induced menopause.

For women with vaginal symptoms, vaginal estrogen tablets or cream are very effective and are safe to use alone or in combination with standard HRT in women with endometriosis. If your health professional is struggling to manage your situation they can refer you to a menopause specialist in your area to help you.

Putting The Risks And Benefits Of Hrt In Perspective

If you’re just glancing at list above, some of the risks of HRT might seem to overwhelm the benefits. Could a reduction in vaginal dryness possibly be worth an increased risk of cancer?

But look at the details. The risks of HRT — while real — are quite small for an individual person. For example, the 2002 Women’s Health Initiative study found that ERT increased the risk of strokes by 39%. That sounds frighteningly high. But the actual number of people affected is very small. Out of 10,000 women who are not taking ERT, 32 have strokes each year. Out of 10,000 who are taking ERT, 44 have strokes each year. That’s an increase of just 12 people out of 10,000.

On the other hand, when it comes to controlling the symptoms of surgical menopause, a huge number of women feel the benefits. One out of four menopausal women has severe hot flashes. Treatment with hormone therapy cuts down the number of hot flashes per week by 75%. So if a woman had 24 hot flashes per week, HRT would drop that number to six. That could make a big difference in the quality of their day-to-day life.

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Are You Headed For Menopause

You may start to notice changes months or years before you are in menopause. You may have hot flashes and irregular periods. This time is called perimenopause.

You won’t know exactly when your menopause will hit. All you can do is pay attention to how you’re feeling and notice changes. Keep in mind that symptoms vary greatly from woman to woman. Some women have no symptoms at all.

Can Menopause Affect Sleep

Can Periods Restart After Menopause?

Some women may experience trouble sleeping through the night and insomnia during menopause. Insomnia is an inability to fall asleep or stay asleep at night. This can be a normal side effect of menopause itself, or it could be due to another symptom of menopause. Hot flashes are a common culprit of sleepless nights during menopause.

If hot flashes keep you awake at night, try:

  • Staying cool at night by wearing loose clothing.
  • Keeping your bedroom well-ventilated.

Avoiding certain foods and behaviors that trigger your hot flashes. If spicy food typically sets off a hot flash, avoid eating anything spicy before bed.

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Menopause Treatment: Natural Remedies

Are natural remedies are good for menopause? Many women try alternative treatments for menopausal symptoms. Certain botanicals, or herbal supplements, are advertised to treat hot flashes and other menopause symptoms. However, the US FDA does not regulate herbal supplements, so they may not always be safe.

Herbal Supplements That Have Been Suggested to Ease Menopause Symptoms

  • Phytoestrogens
  • Vitamin E
  • Wild yam

If you decide to try these remedies, or other herbal products, be sure to discuss this with your doctor. Some botanical or herbal supplements can interact with prescription drugs.

It May Make Your Symptoms More Manageable

Mirena can improve at least one menopause symptom heavy bleeding.

In the years leading up to menopause , your estrogen and progesterone levels bounce up and down. These shifting hormone levels can make your periods lighter or heavier than usual.

At least 25 percent of women who are perimenopausal get heavy periods. Your monthly flow may get so heavy that you soak through a pad or tampon every couple of hours. Mirena should lighten your periods and put you into a more normal flow pattern.

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How Do I Know If I Am Going Through Early Or Premature Menopause

You know you have gone through menopause when you have not had your period for 12 months in a row. If you think you may be reaching menopause early, talk to your doctor or nurse.

  • Your doctor or nurse will ask you about your symptoms, such as hot flashes, irregular periods, sleep problems, and vaginal dryness.
  • Your doctor or nurse may give you a blood test to measure estrogen and related hormones, like . You may choose to get tested if you want to know whether you can still get pregnant. Your doctor or nurse will test your hormone levels in the first few days of your menstrual cycle .

Perimenopause: Rocky Road To Menopause

How To Stop Fibroid Bleeding Between Periods

What are the signs of perimenopause? You’re in your 40s, you wake up in a sweat at night, and your periods are erratic and often accompanied by heavy bleeding: Chances are, you’re going through perimenopause. Many women experience an array of symptoms as their hormones shift during the months or years leading up to menopause that is, the natural end of menstruation. Menopause is a point in time, but perimenopause is an extended transitional state. It’s also sometimes referred to as the menopausal transition, although technically, the transition ends 12 months earlier than perimenopause .

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What Is The Difference Between Premature Menopause And Early Menopause

The difference between premature menopause and early menopause is when it happens. Premature menopause occurs before a woman is 40. Early menopause is when a woman undergoes menopause before age 45.

Many of the causes of premature menopause can also be causes of early menopause. The two types of menopause also share many of the same symptoms.

Menopause And Good Nutrition

It’s never too late to start living a healthy lifestyle. Regular checkups should include a measurement of cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure. Be sure not to skip routine preventive screenings such as mammograms. Consuming plant-based foods that have isoflavones may slightly increase estrogen levels because the plants act like a weak form of estrogen.

Menopause nutrition therapy for some women may include soy protein. Soy is an example of a food that contains isoflavones and may relieve menopause symptoms. Women also tend to have low levels of calcium and iron. Getting enough calcium and iron is extremely important for women transitioning through menopause. You can work with your doctor to establish a plan for a healthy lifestyle including a nutritious diet, physical activity, and stress management skills.

Diet and Nutrition for Menopausal Women

The following are tips to better nutrition for women approaching or past menopause:

  • Eat approximately 1,200 milligrams of calcium each day
  • Eat approximately 9 milligrams of iron each day
  • Eat approximately 21 milligrams of fiber each day
  • Eat 1 ½ cups of fruit and 2 cups of vegetables each day
  • Read and understand food labels
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Cut back on fatty foods
  • Limit sugar and salt intake

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Will I Still Enjoy Sex After Menopause

You should still be able to enjoy sex after menopause. Sometimes, decreased sex drive is related to discomfort and painful intercourse. After treating the source of this pain , many women are able to enjoy intimacy again. Hormone therapy can also help many women. If you are having difficulties enjoying sex after menopause, talk to your healthcare provider.

What Can I Do About Hot Flashes

What to Expect During Perimenopause

Hot flashes occur from a decrease in estrogen levels. In response to this, your glands release higher amounts of other hormones that affect the brain’s thermostat, causing your body temperature to fluctuate. Hormone therapy has been shown to relieve some of the discomfort of hot flashes for many women. However, the decision to start using these hormones should be made only after you and your healthcare provider have evaluated your risk versus benefit ratio.

To learn more about women’s health, and specifically hormone therapy, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health launched the Women’s Health Initiative in 1991. The hormone trial had 2 studies: the estrogen-plus-progestin study of women with a uterus and the estrogen-alone study of women without a uterus. Both studies ended early when the research showed that hormone therapy did not help prevent heart disease and it increased risk for some medical problems. Follow-up studies found an increased risk of heart disease in women who took estrogen-plus-progestin therapy, especially those who started hormone therapy more than 10 years after menopause.

The WHI recommends that women follow the FDA advice on hormone therapy. It states that hormone therapy should not be taken to prevent heart disease.

Practical suggestions for coping with hot flashes include:

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Managing Surgical Menopause Symptoms

To reduce negative side effects of surgical menopause, doctors may recommend hormone replacement therapy. HRT counteracts the hormones youve lost after surgery.

HRT also lowers the risk of developing heart disease and prevents bone density loss and osteoporosis. This is especially important for younger women who have removed their ovaries before natural menopause.

Women younger than 45 who have their ovaries removed and who arent taking HRT are at an increased risk of developing cancer and heart and neurological diseases.

However, HRT has also been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for women with a strong family history of cancer.

You can also manage your surgical menopausal symptoms through lifestyle changes that help to reduce stress and alleviate pain.

Try the following to reduce discomfort from hot flashes:

  • Carry a portable fan.

Menopause Reversal Restores Periods And Produces Fertile Eggs

Women who have already passed through the menopause may be able to have children following a blood treatment usually used to heal wounds

Never too old?

Peter Dazeley/Getty

MENOPAUSE need not be the end of fertility. A team claims to have found a way to rejuvenate post-menopausal ovaries, enabling them to release fertile eggs, New Scientist can reveal.

The team says its technique has restarted periods in menopausal women, including one who had not menstruated in five years. If the results hold up to wider scrutiny, the technique may boost declining fertility in older women, allow women with early menopause to get pregnant, and help stave off the detrimental health effects of menopause.

It offers a window of hope that menopausal women will be able to get pregnant using their own genetic material, says Konstantinos Sfakianoudis, a gynaecologist at the Greek fertility clinic Genesis Athens.

It is potentially quite exciting, says Roger Sturmey at Hull York Medical School in the UK. But it also opens up ethical questions over what the upper age limit of mothers should be.

The age of motherhood is creeping up, and more women are having children in their 40s than ever before. But as more women delay pregnancy, many find themselves struggling to get pregnant. Women who hope to conceive later in life are increasingly turning to IVF and egg freezing, but neither are a reliable back-up option .

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Is Hormone Replacement A Safe Option For Management Of Menopausal Problems

Several hormone therapies are FDA-approved for treatment of hot flashes and prevention of bone loss. The benefits and risks vary depending on the severity of your hot flashes and bone loss, and your health. These therapies may not be right for you. Talk to your doctor before trying any hormone therapies.

Is There A Risk Of Reactivated Endometriosis Transforming Into Cancer

Hormone replacement therapy: Uses, types, and alternatives

Reactivation of endometriosis by HRT is very rare and it is impossible to say how likely it is for endometriosis to turn into cancer. However, there have been a few reported cases of it occurring. This means that while on HRT, if you develop new symptoms or old symptoms start to recur, it is important to discuss this with your healthcare professional who can start any investigations that are needed. From all the evidence it seems that there is very little risk of reactivation of endometriosis or cancer for women on HRT who have had a removal of both of their ovaries and all of their endometriosis removed. For women with some endometriosis who are under 45 or who have significant menopause symptoms the evidence suggests that the benefit of taking HRT to manage the menopause symptoms outweighs the small risk of worsening of the endometriosis or risk of cancer.

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