HomeFactsCan Menopause Symptoms Come Back Years Later

Can Menopause Symptoms Come Back Years Later

Tips For Reducing Hot Flushes

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You can try these tips to ease your symptoms:

  • cut out or reduce coffee and tea
  • stop smoking
  • keep the room cool and use a fan if necessary
  • if you feel a flush coming on, spray your face with cool water or use a cold gel pack
  • wear loose layers of light cotton or silk clothes so you can easily take some clothes off if you overheat
  • have layers of sheets on the bed, rather than a duvet, so you can remove them as you need to
  • cut down on alcohol
  • sip cold or iced drinks
  • have a lukewarm shower or bath instead of a hot one
  • if medicine is causing your hot flushes, talk to your doctor about other ways you can take it to avoid this side effect

Treatments For Hot Flushes

Many women learn to live with menopause-related hot flushes, but if they’re really bothering you and interfering with your day-to-day life, talk to a GP about treatments that may help.

The most effective treatment for hot flushes is hormone replacement therapy , which usually completely gets rid of them. Your doctor will talk to you about the benefits and risks of using HRT.

If you have had a type of cancer that’s sensitive to hormones, such as breast cancer, your doctor will not recommend HRT and will talk to you about alternatives.

Other medicines have been shown to help, including some antidepressants and a medicine called clonidine.

Q: What Causes Hot Flashes

A:;The exact causes of hot flashes are still unknown, but they are thought to be related to changes in the brains thermoregulatory center, which controls heat production and loss, and is influenced by your hormones. During perimenopause, hormones start acting like a rollercoaster, with progesterone and estrogen levels changing in wide variations. These ups and downs dont settle down until almost 10 years after menopause.

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How Long Do The Stages Of Menopause Last

  • Perimenopause: The first phase of the process is perimenopause. Estrogen levels begin to decrease somewhat during this time, and this causes monthly cycles to become irregular. In addition, estrogen levels tend to fluctuate during this period of time, which means that menopause-like symptoms will also fluctuate.;
  • Perimenopause typically lasts for four to six years, but it can last as long as 12 years for some women. In most cases, the onset occurs between ages 35-45. However, it can occur earlier or later in a minority of women. While they do remain potentially fertile during this time, it becomes far more difficult to conceive. Hot flashes, fatigue, chills, and other symptoms associated with menopause begin to emerge during this stage.;

  • Menopause: After a year goes by with no monthly cycles, menopause has occurred. This is when the most intense symptoms appear. Typically, they will increase during the first year after the start of menopause, and then theyll decrease gradually over a period of several years. It typically occurs between ages 45 and 55, but it can be earlier or later for some women. Occasionally, it occurs in the early 60s. Rarely, it can occur as early as ones 20s or 30s, but this is quite uncommon.;
  • How Can You Alleviate Perimenopausal Symptoms

    5 things most women get wrong about hormones

    Some women deal with the symptoms of perimenopause, and some women seek treatment for specific health concerns. Women with heavy bleeding, periods that last longer than seven days, spotting between periods or cycles that are less than 21 days should contact a doctor.

    Typically, perimenopause is a gradual transition, and no particular test indicates what is happening to the body. Hormone therapy, vaginal estrogen treatments and antidepressants can help treat perimenopausal symptoms.

    Start by identifying what’s bothering you most and then working with your doctor to address it. There are steps you can take to feel better. Lifestyle changes that can make a big impact in easing perimenopausal symptoms and improving your overall health include:

    • Yoga

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    Is Having A Hard Time Concentrating And Being Forgetful A Normal Part Of Menopause

    Unfortunately, concentration and minor memory problems can be a normal part of menopause. Though this doesnt happen to everyone, it can happen. Doctors arent sure why this happens. If youre having memory problems during menopause, call your healthcare provider. There are several activities that have been shown to stimulate the brain and help rejuvenate your memory. These activities can include:

    • Doing crossword puzzles and other mentally stimulating activities like reading and doing math problems.
    • Cutting back on passive activities like watching TV.
    • Getting plenty of exercise.

    Keep in mind that depression and anxiety can also impact your memory. These conditions can be linked to menopause.

    Calcium And Vitamin D

    A combination of calcium and vitamin D can reduce the risk of osteoporosis, the bone loss associated with menopause. The best sources are from calcium-rich and vitamin D-fortified foods.

    Doctors are currently reconsidering the use of calcium and vitamin D supplements. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises that healthy postmenopausal women don’t need to take these supplements. According to the USPSTF, taking daily low-dose amounts of vitamin D supplements , with or without calcium supplements , does not prevent fractures. For higher doses, the USPSTF says there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation. In addition to possible lack of benefit, these supplements are associated with certain risks, like kidney stones.

    However, calcium and vitamin D are important nutrients. Supplements may be appropriate for certain people including those who do not get enough vitamin D through sunlight exposure and those who do not consume enough calcium in their diet. They are also helpful for people who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis. Talk with your doctor about whether or not you should take supplements.

    The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends:

    Calcium

    Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption of calcium in the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and is the essential companion to calcium in maintaining strong bones.

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    What Is Hormone Therapy

    During menopause, your body goes through major hormonal changes, decreasing the amount of hormones it makes particularly estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen and progesterone are produced by the ovaries. When your ovaries no longer make enough estrogen and progesterone, hormone therapy can be used as a supplement. Hormone therapy boosts your hormone levels and can help relieve some symptoms of menopause. Its also used as a preventative measure for osteoporosis.

    There are two main types of hormone therapy:

    • Estrogen therapy : In this treatment, estrogen is taken alone. Its typically prescribed in a low dose and can be taken as a pill or patch. ET can also be given to you as a cream, vaginal ring, gel or spray. This type of treatment is used after a hysterectomy. Estrogen alone cant be used if a woman still has a uterus.
    • Estrogen Progesterone/Progestin Hormone Therapy : This treatment is also called combination therapy because it uses doses of estrogen and progesterone. Progesterone is available in its natural form, or also as a progestin . This type of hormone therapy is used if you still have your uterus.

    Hormone therapy can relieve many of the symptoms of menopause, including:

    • Hot flashes and night sweats.
    • Vaginal dryness.

    What Are The Long

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    There are several conditions that you could be at a higher risk of after menopause. Your risk for any condition depends on many things like your family history, your health before menopause and lifestyle factors . Two conditions that affect your health after menopause are osteoporosis and coronary artery disease.

    Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis, a “brittle-bone” disease, occurs when the inside of bones become less dense, making them more fragile and likely to fracture. Estrogen plays an important role in preserving bone mass. Estrogen signals cells in the bones to stop breaking down.

    Women lose an average of 25% of their bone mass from the time of menopause to age 60. This is largely because of the loss of estrogen. Over time, this loss of bone can lead to bone fractures. Your healthcare provider may want to test the strength of your bones over time. Bone mineral density testing, also called bone densitometry, is a quick way to see how much calcium you have in certain parts of your bones. The test is used to detectosteoporosis and osteopenia. Osteopenia is a disease where bone density is decreased and this can be a precursor to later osteoporosis.

    If you have osteoporosis or osteopenia, your treatment options could include estrogen therapy.

    Coronary artery disease

    • The loss of estrogen .
    • Increased blood pressure.
    • A decrease in physical activity.
    • Bad habits from your past catching up with you .

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    Are There Any Risks Related To Hormone Therapy

    Like most prescribed medications, there are risks for hormone therapy. Some known health risks include:

    • Endometrial cancer .
    • Gallstones and gallbladder issues.

    Going on hormone therapy is an individualized decision. Discuss all past medical conditions and your family history with your healthcare provider to understand the risks versus benefits of hormone therapy for you.

    Hot Flashes And Your Breast Cancer Risk

    Heres some good news to make hot flashes a little more bearable: Women who have hot flashes may have a lower risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention. Researchers from Seattles Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center interviewed 1,500 women some with breast cancer, some without and found that those who experienced hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause had half the risk of invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma, two common forms of breast cancer. Furthermore, the worse they said their hot flashes were, the lower their risk appeared to be. Think about that the next time you just cant get cool!

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    Urinary Frequency Or Urgency

    To sum it up: less estrogen, more peeing. Additionally, a drop in the hormone can make it more difficult to hold it when you feel the urge. At night, this need to go can make sleep issues worse.

    Many of the same localized treatments for vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain can ease this other part of genitourinary syndromeyet another reason to discuss these very common symptoms with your doctor to find the right remedy.

    What You Can Do To Stay Healthy Postmenopause

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    Its never been more important to take a proactive role in your health care. Many women suffer unnecessarily from symptoms that can be managed with prescribed treatments or home remedies. Talk to your doctor before you begin taking any new supplement or treatment, including over-the-counter and herbal remedies.

    Aside from hormone therapy some of the most common postmenopausal treatments include:

    • Hormone therapy: Helps reduce hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and may prevent bone loss.
    • Vaginal estrogen: Relieves vaginal dryness, discomfort during sex, and some urinary symptoms.
    • Calcium and vitamin D supplements or other osteoporosis treatments: Aids in strengthening bones.
    • Vaginal lubricants: Increases comfort during sex.
    • Incontinence treatments: Various lifestyle changes and medical options for gaining bladder control.
    • Exercise: Stimulates heart and bone health and maintains healthy weight.
    • Diet: Helps manage healthy weight.

    Postmenopausal health is about a lot more than your ovaries and uterus. Keep up with annual physical exams and schedule those regular preventive screenings, such as mammogram, bone density screening, Pap smear, mole checks, and colonoscopy. Remember your teeth and gums and your eyes, too. Theres never been a better time to focus on your own well-being.

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    What Are The Stages Leading Up To Menopause

    After puberty, there are three other phases of female fertility:

    • Pre-menopause:;Women have full ovarian function, regularly produce estrogen and ovulate.
    • Perimenopause:;The ovaries begin to fluctuate in their ovulation and production of estrogen, which can result in unpredictable menstrual cycles and symptoms.
    • Menopause: When the ovaries have shut down. Someone would be in menopause after 12 months without menses.

    Can Menopause Cause Facial Hair Growth

    Yes, increased facial hair growth can be a change related to menopause. The hormonal change your body goes through during menopause can result in several physical changes to your body, including more facial hair than you may have had in the past. If facial hair becomes a problem for you, waxing or using other hair removers may be options. Talk to your healthcare provider about your options to make sure you dont pick a product that could harm your skin.

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    What Does A Hot Flush Feel Like

    Women often describe a hot flush as a creeping feeling of intense warmth that quickly spreads across your whole body and face.

    It typically lasts for several minutes. Others say the warmth is similar to the sensation of being under a sun bed, or feeling like a furnace.

    The website healthtalk.org has several videos where women describe what a hot flush feels like.

    Can Menopause Affect Sleep

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    Some women may experience trouble sleeping through the night and insomnia during menopause. Insomnia is an inability to fall asleep or stay asleep at night. This can be a normal side effect of menopause itself, or it could be due to another symptom of menopause. Hot flashes are a common culprit of sleepless nights during menopause.

    If hot flashes keep you awake at night, try:

    • Staying cool at night by wearing loose clothing.
    • Keeping your bedroom well-ventilated.

    Avoiding certain foods and behaviors that trigger your hot flashes. If spicy food typically sets off a hot flash, avoid eating anything spicy before bed.

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    Let’s Recap First: What Is Menopause Exactly

    The actual definition of menopause is when your periods stop completely for a full 12 monthswhich means no spotting or bleeding in between. The average age for menopause is between 51 and 52 years old. More specifically, most women have their last period at 51, and officially enter menopause at 52.

    Do Phytoestrogen Treatments Reduce The Number And Severity Of Hot Flushes And Are They Safe And Acceptable

    Cochrane evidenceCochrane Reviews are systematic reviews. In systematic reviews we search for and summarize studies that answer a specific research question . The studies are identified, assessed, and summarized by using a systematic and predefined approach. They inform recommendations for healthcare and research. More: A Cochrane review includes 43 randomisedRandomization is the process of randomly dividing into groups the people taking part in a trial. One group will be given the intervention being tested and compared with a group which does not receive the intervention . ;Morecontrolled trialsA trial in which a group is given a intervention being tested is compared with a group which does not receive the intervention . More with over 4000 women, but many were small, brief and poor quality, and looked at many different types of phytoestrogens.

    There is no conclusive evidence to show that phytoestrogen supplements effectively reduce the frequency or severity of hot flushes and night sweats in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.

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    Why Menopausal Symptoms May Return

    During perimenopause and early menopause the ovaries still produce a small amount of oestrogen and some will also be produced by fat throughout the body. It is the fluctuation and eventual decline of oestrogen at menopause that cause troublesome issues. HRT replaces the body’s natural oestrogen, thus reducing symptoms.

    A progestogen hormone is also given with oestrogen in combined HRT to protect the womb, so that the lining doesn’t become too thick and cause endometrial cancer.

    “The general recommendation is to start on a low-dose preparation and often that will be enough to top up the levels,” says Dr Heather Currie, an associate specialist gynaecologist at Dumfries and Galloway NHS, and past Chair of the British Menopause Society.

    A few years down the line the ovaries will produce less oestrogen and this may lead to a recurrence of symptoms.

    “Some women may think their HRT isn’t working anymore,” she continues, “but it’s doing what it’s always been doing; it’s just that the total amount of oestrogen in your system may be less. Thats quite a common reason for recurrence of menopausal symptoms and you may need to up your dose of HRT.”

    Dr Tina Peers, a menopause specialist at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Menopause Clinic, agrees:

    However, Currie points out that blood tests to measure hormone levels are not always considered necessary in managing HRT dosage and are not standard GP practice.

    What to do if HRT seems to have stopped working for you

    When To Seek Help

    Menopause Thinning

    Its common and normal to experience irregular periods when youre perimenopausal.

    However, other conditions, like polycystic ovary syndrome or cervical cancer, can also cause irregular bleeding. See your doctor to rule out other causes if you:

    • suddenly experience very heavy periods or periods with blood clots
    • have periods lasting longer than usual
    • spot or bleed after sex
    • spot or bleed after your period
    • have periods close together

    Osteoporosis and heart disease are long-term health risks associated with menopause. Thats because estrogen plays a significant role in protecting your bones and your heart. Without estrogen, youre at an increased risk for both diseases.

    Youre also at an increased risk of urinary tract infections because menopause can cause your urethra to become dry, irritated, or inflamed. Vaginal infections can also occur more frequently because your vagina has become dryer and thinner.

    Report menopausal symptoms when visiting the doctor. Get assessed by your physician if you continue to have menopausal symptoms that are unbearable or last more than five years after your last menstrual period.

    Although menopause can cause uncomfortable symptoms for some women, this natural process has possible upsides, too. There are several potential benefits of menopause to consider:

    You will still need to protect yourself from sexually transmitted diseases.

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