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Can Menopause Last Into Your 60s

How Long Does The Menopause Last

Perimenopause vs. Menopause: Signs, Symptoms & Treatments with Dr. Katrina Kelly | San Diego Health

Symptoms of the menopause can start months or even years before periods stop completely. They usually continue for around 4 years after your last period, though some womens symptoms continue for much longer.

The menopause usually happens between the ages of 45 and 55, but its very difficult to predict when it will take place in an individual.

Predicting Natural Menopause: Why Does Age Matter

If theres not a lot that women can do to change when theyll experience menopause, why does predicting it even matter?

It would be helpful for every woman to know exactly when menopause will arrive. Beyond recognizing and addressing issues such as increased cardiovascular disease risk and risks related to bone health, if a woman knows her age of menopause and how long the perimenopause transition will last, it could help her make important health decisions, says Faubion.

If youre bleeding like crazy it would be helpful to know, she says.

As of now, research hasnt uncovered a way to determine when a women will go into menopause, but having that information could be useful in making decisions such as whether to have a or other invasive procedures, says Faubion. If menopause is going to be a few months or a year from now, you may choose to wait it out if it’s going to be five years from now, you might want to go ahead and have an invasive procedure, she says.

The ability to predict when menopause will occur could also help with managing or deciding which type of birth control to use, adds Faubion.

How Does Menopause Affect My Bladder Control

Unfortunately, bladder control issues are common for people going through menopause. There are several reasons why this happens, including:

  • Estrogen. This hormone plays several roles in your body. It not only controls your period and promotes changes in your body during pregnancy, estrogen also keeps the lining of your bladder and urethra healthy.
  • Pelvic floor muscles. They support the organs in your pelvis your bladder and uterus. Throughout your life, these muscles can weaken. This can happen during pregnancy, childbirth and from weight gain. When the muscles weaken, you can experience urinary incontinence .

Specific bladder control problems that you might have can include:

  • Stress incontinence .
  • Urge incontinence .
  • Painful urination .
  • Nocturia .

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Postmenopause Symptoms At Age 60 And Beyond

While some women may believe hormonal imbalance symptoms stop with menopause, it is not uncommon for women to experience them well into their postmenopausal years, even after the age of 60.

Continue reading to learn all about postmenopause symptoms over the age of 60, including which ones are more common and how to go about treating them for long-lasting relief.

How Can I Manage Hot Flashes After Menopause

Hot flashes can last longer than you think

Managing hot flashes after 60 works the same as managing hot flashes throughout the perimenopausal transition. Consider the following tips:

  • Follow a healthy diet with less caffeine and sugar and more whole grains, fresh fruits, and fresh vegetables, especially those containing phytoestrogens and vitamins to reduce hot flashes.

  • Implement regular exercise into your routine to improve blood circulation and promote endocrine system health.

  • Try to avoid known hot flash triggers, such as spicy or heavily-seasoned foods alcohol excess caffeine and prolonged stress, among others.

  • Make your bedtime routine less conducive to nocturnal hot flashes, called night sweats, by sleeping in a cool room using lightweight, breathable pajamas for menopause and purchasing temperature-regulating bed sheets.

  • Take a cool shower right before bedtime to reduce your body temperature.

  • Keep a diary and note down when you get hot flashes. Over time, this could reveal a pattern, help you notice the triggers, and prompt lifestyle alterations.

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What Conditions Can Cause Early Menopause

Certain medical and surgical conditions can influence the timing of menopause.

Surgical removal of the ovaries

The surgical removal of the ovaries in an ovulating woman will result in an immediate menopause, sometimes termed a surgical menopause, or induced menopause. In this case, there is no perimenopause, and after surgery, a woman will generally experience the signs and symptoms of menopause. In cases of surgical menopause, women often report that the abrupt onset of menopausal symptoms results in particularly severe symptoms, but this is not always the case.

The ovaries are often removed together with the removal of the uterus . If a hysterectomy is performed without removal of both ovaries in a woman who has not yet reached menopause, the remaining ovary or ovaries are still capable of normal hormone production. While a woman cannot menstruate after the uterus is removed by a hysterectomy, the ovaries themselves can continue to produce hormones up until the normal time when menopause would naturally occur. At this time, a woman could experience the other symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and mood swings. These symptoms would then not be associated with the cessation of menstruation. Another possibility is that premature ovarian failure will occur earlier than the expected time of menopause, as early as one to two years following the hysterectomy. If this happens, a woman may or may not experience symptoms of menopause.

Cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

Treatment For Early Or Premature Menopause

There is no treatment available to make the ovaries start working again.

Rarely, the ovaries may spontaneously start working again, for reasons unknown. According to some studies, about one in 10 women who are diagnosed with premature ovarian insufficiency get pregnant, for reasons that are not yet clear.

Women with early menopause have a long period of postmenopausal life, which means they are at increased risk of health problems such as early onset of osteoporosis and heart disease. For this reason, it is recommended that they take some form of hormone therapy until they reach the typical age of menopause . This may be the combined oestrogen and progestogen oral contraceptive pill, or menopausal hormone therapy .

Either option treats menopausal symptoms and reduces the risk of early onset of osteoporosis and heart disease.

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Home Remedies: Plant Estrogens

Plant estrogens

Isoflavones are chemical compounds found in soy and other plants that are phytoestrogens, or plant-derived estrogens. There is a perception among many women that plant estrogens are “natural” and therefore safer than HT, but medical researchers haven’t proven this scientifically. Most scientific studies have not shown a benefit of phytoestrogens in controlling hot flashes. In addition, there is concern that some phytoestrogens might act like estrogen in some tissues of the body. Therefore, many experts recommend that women who have a history of breast cancer avoid phytoestrogens.

What Is Premature Menopause

News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you think

Menopause, when it occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, is considered “natural” and is a normal part of aging. But, some people can experience menopause early, either as a result of surgical intervention or damage to the ovaries . Menopause that occurs before the age of 45 is called early menopause. Menopause that occurs at 40 or younger is considered premature menopause. When there this no medical or surgical cause for premature menopause it’s called primary ovarian insufficiency.

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Will Hormone Therapy Help Prevent Long

The benefits and risks of hormone therapy vary depending on a womans age and her individual history. In general, younger people in their 50s tend to get more benefits from hormone therapy as compared to those who are postmenopausal in their 60s. People who undergo premature menopause are often treated with hormone therapy until age 50 to avoid the increased risk that comes from the extra years of estrogen loss.

Are There Any Other Emotional Changes That Can Happen During Menopause

Menopause can cause a variety of emotional changes, including:

  • A loss of energy and insomnia.
  • A lack of motivation and difficulty concentrating.
  • Anxiety, depression, mood changes and tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Aggressiveness and irritability.

All of these emotional changes can happen outside of menopause. You have probably experienced some of them throughout your life. Managing emotional changes during menopause can be difficult, but it is possible. Your healthcare provider may be able to prescribe a medication to help you . It may also help to just know that there is a name to the feelings you are experiencing. Support groups and counseling are useful tools when dealing with these emotional changes during menopause.

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Antidepressants And Other Medications

Antidepressant medications: The class of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and related medications has been shown to be effective in controlling the symptoms of hot flashes in up to 60% of women. Specifically, venlafaxine , a drug-related to the SSRIs, and the paroxetine , desvenlafaxine , citalopram , and escitalopram have all been shown to decrease the severity of hot flashes in some women. However, antidepressant medications may be associated with side effects, including or sexual dysfunction.

Other medications: Other prescription medications have been shown to provide some relief for hot flashes, although their specific purpose is not the treatment of hot flashes. All of these may have side effects, and their use should be discussed with and monitored by a doctor. Some of these medications that have been shown to help relieve hot flashes include the antiseizure drug gabapentin and clonidine , a drug used to treat high blood pressure.

Can Menopause Affect Sleep

Top Things To Know About Menopause In Your 30s, 40s, 50s ...

Some people may experience trouble sleeping through the night and insomnia during menopause. Insomnia is an inability to fall asleep or stay asleep at night. This can be a normal side effect of menopause itself, or it could be due to another symptom of menopause. Hot flashes are a common culprit of sleepless nights during menopause.

If hot flashes keep you awake at night, try:

  • Staying cool at night by wearing loose clothing.
  • Keeping your bedroom well-ventilated.

Avoiding certain foods and behaviors that trigger your hot flashes. If spicy food typically sets off a hot flash, avoid eating anything spicy before bed.

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How Does Natural Menopause Occur

Natural menopause is the permanent ending of menstruation that is not brought on by any type of medical treatment. For people undergoing natural menopause, the process is gradual and is described in three stages:

Perimenopause or “menopause transition”: Perimenopause can begin eight to 10 years before menopause when the ovaries gradually produce less estrogen. It usually starts when you’re in your 40s. Perimenopause lasts up until menopause, the point when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. In the last one to two years of perimenopause, the drop in estrogen accelerates. At this stage, many people may experience menopause symptoms. But you are still having menstrual cycles during this time and can get pregnant.

Menopause: Menopause is the point when you no longer have menstrual periods. At this stage, your ovaries have stopped releasing eggs and producing most of their estrogen. Menopause is diagnosed when you’ve gone without a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months.

Postmenopause: This is the name given to the time after you have not had a period for an entire year . During this stage, menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, may ease for many people. However, some people continue to experience menopausal symptoms for a decade or longer after the menopause transition. As a result of a lower level of estrogen, those in the postmenopausal phase are at increased risk for several health conditions, such as osteoporosis and heart disease.

I Got My First Period Early Does That Mean Ill Go Through Menopause Early

I have many patients tell me, I know Im going to go through menopause earlier because I started my period really early, says Streicher. The reason women think that is because they think menopause occurs when you run out of eggs. This isnt going to happen were born with millions of eggs and many of those are never used. When you go through menopause is really about the aging of eggs and what causes them to age more quickly, she says.

The average age of menarche in the United States has gotten younger for a variety of reasons, but that hasnt made women go through menopause earlier, she points out.

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How Long Do Symptoms Last

Perimenopausal symptoms can last four years on average. The symptoms associated with this phase will gradually ease during menopause and postmenopause. Women whove gone an entire year without a period are considered postmenopausal.

Hot flashes, also known as hot flushes, are a common symptom of perimenopause. One study found that moderate to severe hot flashes could continue past perimenopause and last for a

Researchers also found that Black women and women of average weight experience hot flashes for a longer period than white women and women who are considered overweight.

Its possible for a woman to experience menopause before the age of 55. Early menopause occurs in women who go through menopause before theyre 45 years old. Its considered premature menopause if youre menopausal and are 40 years old or younger.

Early or premature menopause can happen for many reasons. Some women can go through early or premature menopause because of surgical intervention, like a hysterectomy. It can also happen if the ovaries are damaged by chemotherapy or other conditions and treatments.

Is Having A Hard Time Concentrating And Being Forgetful A Normal Part Of Menopause

What is Post Menopause?

Unfortunately, concentration and minor memory problems can be a normal part of menopause. Though this doesnt happen to everyone, it can happen. If youre having memory problems during menopause, call your healthcare provider. Several activities have been shown to stimulate the brain and help rejuvenate your memory. These activities can include:

  • Doing crossword puzzles and other mentally stimulating activities like reading and doing math problems.
  • Cutting back on passive activities like watching TV.
  • Getting plenty of exercise.

Keep in mind that depression and anxiety can also impact your memory. These conditions can be linked to menopause.

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How Long Do Perimenopause And Menopause Last

Perimenopause, sometimes referred to as menopausal transition, starts when a woman begins experiencing changes in her menstrual cycle , as well as symptoms related to a decline in estrogen levelsmost notably hot flashes.

The majority of women enter perimenopause sometime in their 40s, with the average age being 47. Perimenopause then ends when a woman has not had a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months this is termed menopause.

Note that perimenopause refers to a period of time whereas menopause refers to a point in timea common misunderstanding and source of confusion.

The period of time after menopause is called postmenopause. During postmenopause, a woman has not had a menstrual cycle for over a year, although she may still be experiencing symptoms related to estrogen deficiency like vaginal atrophy.

The average length of perimenopause is four years, so the mean age at which a woman reaches menopause is 51 years old. Of course, though, this is simply an average and does not predict the precise duration of time for any individual woman.

Getting To The Bottom Of It

Postmenopausal bleeding can range from light spotting that is pinkish-gray or brown, all the way to a heavy flow, like a regular period. Most of the time, there is no pain with the bleeding. No matter your exact symptoms, youll want to get in touch with your ob-gyn right away if this happens to you.

Any evaluation should start with a detailed conversation, either in person or via telehealth . Your ob-gyn should ask questions such as:

  • When did you go through menopause? The longer its been, the greater cause for concern and the more testing we might need to do.
  • Are you taking any new medications? Some drugs, such as blood thinners and some mental health medications, can have vaginal bleeding as a side effect.
  • What else is going on with your health? Other medical conditions could be relevant.

A pelvic exam usually is needed when were talking about unexplained vaginal bleeding. During the exam, your ob-gyn may look at your vagina and cervix and feel the size of your uterus.

The next steps will depend on your age, how long it has been since you reached menopause, and how much bleeding youre experiencing. Your ob-gyn might suggest a pelvic ultrasound to look at your uterus more closely or a biopsy to take a tissue sample from the lining of your uterus. You might even need both.

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How Long Do Menopause Symptoms Last Longer Than You Think

    When most of us hear about hot flashes and night sweats, we tend to immediately think of menopause and unconsciously assume that those nuisances go away after the change. But as it turns out, these symptoms can actually last long after midlife has passed, according to a new study. We know this research may sound pretty bleak at first, but the good news is that it gives you an opportunity to prepare, as well as a chance to learn how to approach your doctor if this happens to you.

    The May 2018 study published in the Journal of the North American Menopause Society found that hot flashes and night sweats can sometimes last well into a womans 60s, 70s, and even 80s. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 5,000 women and found that a significant amount of women over 60 years old still experienced those pesky symptoms commonly associated with menopause. But heres where things start looking up: These women are actively seeking medical help for the issues, which may have been left totally unaddressed and untreated decades ago before scientists knew about them.

    The number of women in the study who both reported and sought care for symptom management shines a light on what may be an unmet medical need for women over age 60, said study author Paru David, MD, in a press release. With increased awareness, clinicians can identify these distressing symptoms and review treatment options with women, which can lead to improved quality of life.

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